(Slightly Soft) Roasted Leftover Pear, Stilton & Walnut salad

(Slightly Soft) Roasted Leftover Pear, Stilton & Walnut salad

Pears are a tricky beast. Buy a bag of 6, and how many do you really eat, every time?  3?  4?  All?!  GTAF.  I make like Nigel Slater and put four in a bowl to ripen, give those round little bottoms a little squeeze a couple of times a day, until they are perfectly ripe and giving and juicy etc etc.  But then it’s 3 days later, the washing mountain is building, the kids homework is beyond late and I remember that the kids don’t really like pears.  My once perfectly sweet bowl of pears are threatening to turn themselves into Lambrini Perry, scrumpy edition.

So, how to avoid the pitfalls of the mushy pear?  Once they’re fermenting in the bowl, they are, well, fermenting and there’s fuck all you can do about it.  (I am, right now, imagining my GCSE English teacher, Mr Lanaway, admonishing me for an over-reliance on swearing in my work.  I feel expressing the frustration of wasting £2.50 and a contribution to our food waste mountain is judicious, sir. Ahem).

Anyway.  Back to pears.  Once they are ripe PUT THEM IN THE FRIDGE.  THE FRIDGE.  Right at the front SO YOU DON’T FORGET TO EAT THEM OKAY?

If your pears are a teeny bit mushy without being the whole hoopla rank, then just cook them.  Yes!  Cook them!

I am not a blue cheese fan.  Indeed, I used to sit on the cold – real October cold – pavement outside my dad’s favourite cheese shop, holding my nose and bawking.  I once asked a cheesemonger for a cheese “that isn’t really festy”.  I then told *these* little lines to The Cheese Buyer of Neal’s Yard. FFS.

Anyway.  If you’re looking to use up your roasted pears AND start sampling the delights of blue cheese, may I recommend this warm salad?  The cheese melts onto the nuts and pears, which does the job of making pears in salad less odd AND the cheese less intense.  If you think pears in salad is weird – remember StorrCupboard lovers! – tomatoes are fruits, so, you know, get over it and try it.  Or wait until my 2 other recipes come out 🙂

Warm, roasted leftover pears with toasty walnuts and melty cheese?  You are so welcome.

(Slightly Soft) Pear, Stilton & Walnut Salad

Serves 1-2

Ingredients

NOTE – this is more of a method than a *recipe* – so if you have 35 grams or 75 grams of nuts or cheese, get ’em used up x

2 pears – anything from *will NEVER ripen & I’m going on holiday tomorrow” to “oh god I’d better eat them even though they’re the wrong side of soft”
1/2 tablespoon of fat; I used pork fat for umami/keeping it cheap, but ground nut or vegetable oil would be great.  Avoid olive, too strong
around 50 grams of walnuts or pecans
around 50 grams of Stilton or other blue cheese
Few handfuls of salad leaves

Tools

Colander/sieve
Baking tray
Teaspoon
Scales
Chopping board
Knife
Mixing bowl
Tea towel/kitchen paper

Time

10 minutes prep
30 minutes to roast pears
5 more minutes to mix

Prep

Preheat the oven to 180C
Cut your pears in half and remove the core; chop into about 3 pieces, for even cooking
*I don’t peel the pears as I think that the skin provides a nice texture, but it’s up to you*
Place on the baking sheet and drizzle the oil all over
Roughly chop the blue cheese

Method

Place the oiled pears in the oven
Wash the salad leaves and leave to drain; either spin or pat dry with a clean tea towel
Place the salad leaves in a mixing bowl
After 20 minutes, add the nuts to the tray and coat in the oil
TIMER ON; check after 5 minutes
The nuts are done when they smell all toasty; take them out a little too soon rather than burnt
When the nuts are golden brown and the pears a little caramelised, remove from the oven
Stir the cheese into the pears and nuts on the tray
Mix the warm pear-cheese-nut goo into the salad leaves
Eat!

Storage
You can store the roasted pears for between 1 and 5 days, depending on how ripe they were when you roasted them.  You can roast alongside the nuts but do not store together, because the nuts will go soggy (insert joke here).
To serve from cold, bring to room temperature for a couple of hours before serving, if possible.  Warm through in the oven or in a microwave, if you like.

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

Bursting tomato sauce

Bursting tomato sauce

Sad tomatoes.  Just a few.
How often do you cook or use tomato sauce?  How often do you chuck raw tomatoes?  They are in the top 5 of wasted fruit & veg and, as we learned the other day, use a shit tonne of C02 to get to ripeness (is that a word?) in the UK.
But people. As you make your chilli, your tomato sauce, your bolognese (non-Brits, we in the UK call ragu ‘bolognese’, just cos of how it was marketed to the UK.  Like “Italian rarebit”….). Well, you use tinned tomatoes, right? So, how about just shoving those manky tomatoes into your sauce, too?

I can’t be arsed with crossing and blanching and peeling tomatoes, so I love this trick I got from River Cottage: cut your toms into quarters, and take out the seeds, if you like. Then, like so, grate the tomato and voila! No skin!

 

So take your sad, energy packed tomatoes and add them to your sauce. Food waste averted!

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

Manky melon & cucumber salsa

Manky melon & cucumber salsa

Okay this is my favourite of the week’s leftovers.  Sweet and refreshing, a little crunch and a lot of flavour.  It was totally inspired by Zoe Adjonyoh’s mango and pineapple salad from a few weeks ago.

I would never, ever have thought of mixing these flavours together, but that’s what I love about leftover cooking – sometimes shit has to get creative.  Or just, you know, ask me and I’ll do the thinking for you. X

 

Melon & cucumber salsa

 

150g melon after peeling and de-seeding (about 1/4 a galia melon)
100g cucumber after peeling and de-seeding (so about 125g to start off with)
1/2 small red onion (about 45g)
About 15 mint leaves
Pinch salt

 

Tools

Scales
Two large mixing bowls
Sharp knife
Mixing bowl

Time
30 minutes

Level
Simple

 

Prep

Finely, finely dice the onion into pieces a couple of mm
Sprinkle the salt over and leave for about half an hour
Cut the melon in half, half again and half, again!
Cut out and discard seeds and skin
Chop the cucumber; take the core out of the cucumber

Method

When you are ready to eat the salsa, finely chop the mint leaves
Stir the mint leaves into the fruit
Seriously, that’s it

Storage

Best eaten fresh, but stored in a lidded container in the fridge, this salsa will keep for a few days.

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

Manky Melon Salad

Manky Melon Salad

Fruit salad can be another saviour of the sad fruit bowl.  Woolly melon needs disguising guys.  I could have given you a recipe for a Russian chilled melon soup or tart but … but melon recipes always say “you must have the sweetest the best the most flavoursome fruit”.  And we don’t have that, always, do we? We have sad, flavourless fruits that really we want to bin.

 

But we are food waste warriors and we are not about to chuck this food that has taken farmers months to grow, has used petrol and fertilisers to get to us and, quite frankly, your hard earned cash to buy.

 

Sometimes it’s good to hide in plain sight.  So, I mixed my shitty old melon with a lovely, sweet mango. Add loads of grapes and a skinned nectarine (note: eldest child told me the nectarine didn’t work. I disagree. You decide).  Pour over a little apple juice if you like, and maybe serve with ice cream. That’s it.

 

Waste averted, bellies full. Happy days!

 

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

(Soft) Apple and Parsnip Fritters

(Soft) Apple and Parsnip Fritters

Did you make the apple snow?  I hear that it was a happy time warp for some people, going back to home-ec lessons.
Maybe the thought of raw egg whites wasn’t your cup of tea, or maybe you’ve got more of a savoury tooth.  These River Cottage parsnip and apple fritters (scroll down) are for you. Hugh’s recipe (which I didn’t change so can’t print) tells you to grate the parsnips.  That didn’t work for me, I mashed them.  These sweet-ish. delicious fritters are perfect with sausages or bacon, or halloumi if you prefer – perfect for a hearty brekkie/brunch or light Sunday tea.
The fritters will keep, covered, in the fridge for a few days, or you can freeze them for a brunch or dinner another day.

 

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

(Soft) Apple Snow

(Soft) Apple Snow

How’s the apple sauce? Have you used it yet?

 

Sometimes the problem with a leftover can be that you just don’t want to eat the damn thing! That’s where transforming them into something else is helpful.

When I was a kid my mum would make this pudding a lot, so I find it comforting. Smooth, slightly bubbly and lush, I love Apple Snow. If you have a family that likes pudding after a big meal,this is a great option because it’s light and not too filling.  It can be a little sweet when you’re making it with eating apples (rather than Bramleys); I’m told that I really don’t like my puddings too sweet.  I grew up on puddings that tasted like the fruit itself, not sugared fruit.  Ergh.  So hold off adding sugar to this, you really don’t need it.

You do need to puree the apple sauce for this, as any lumps would feel a bit wrong.

Couple of things; the bowl you will use to whisk your egg whites needs to be super clean, no fat smears (can you tell that I am a slack washer-upper?). If not, the whites won’t turn into peaks.  To make surely sure, I re-wash and dry the mixing bowl before adding the egg whites.

This pudding does not keep, so eat within a day of making, but ideally within a couple of hours.

Serve on its own or with shortbreads.

Note

Current guidelines say that at-risk groups for illness and pregnant women should avoid raw-egg whites.

Apple snow

Serves 4

Ingredients

400ml apple sauce
1 large egg white *
150ml double cream

* Oh no! If you don’t already have a leftover egg white hanging about, I’ve made you a new one. But this egg yolk can be the inpirtaion for another meal … you can stir through warm pasta, add to a pastry mix, or if you like scrambled eggs/omelettes, just add this yolk. You can also freeze it.

Tools
Scales
Chopping board
Knife
Peeler
Measuring jug
Electric whisk
Immersion blender
Large metal spoon
2 little bowls
2 larger bowls
Small jar/’tupperware’
Spatula

Time
10 minutes prep
20 minutes cook

Level
Easy

Prep

Place 2 little bowls side by side
Crack the egg into a bowl
Using your hands gently lift the yolk out of the egg
Allow the white to strain through your fingers
Place the egg yolk in a lidded container and use within 3 days
Whip the double cream until it stands in soft peaks (so, when you stop using the whisk, the eggs whites are a little droopy)

Method

In a *clean* bowl whisk the egg-white until it too holds in soft peaks
Using a large metal spoon, gently fold the room temperature sauce into the egg; (“folding” just means a slow, gentle, light movement, totally the opposite of whisking.
If you whisk it you will squash all the bubbles out of your egg)
Now fold the whipped cream into the egg and apple mixture
Spoon into small dishes and enjoy

Storage/further meals

This one isn’t much of a keeper; pop it in a lidded container, in the fridge, for up to 2 days. It will be safe to eat, but the egg will start to seperate out.

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

Sign up to the Storr Cupboard Newsletter

...and receive monthly recipe ideas to help you ensure there's never a leftover, leftover PLUS a free downloadable meal planner & kitchen stock check.

Once signed up check your email to confirm your subscription!

We will, of course, always ensure that your data is safe and never spam you!

You have Successfully Subscribed!