Jam-Jar Scraping Thumbprint biscuits

Jam-Jar Scraping Thumbprint biscuits

Thumbprint cookies are a traditional American biscuit, and are a perfect way to use up those scrapings of jam.  Yes, English bakers will call for jam tarts, but they are a little trickier, as you need to make and roll out pastry.  These are easier to make with kids.  And, for those of us who don’t adore jam, the ratio of sweet jam to creamy, plainer biscuit, is better.

This cookie dough benefits from sitting in the fridge overnight, if  you can.

You can see here that I’ve used strawberry, raspberry and marmalade: because you only need a teaspoon for each biscuit it’s a great recipe for using up ‘odds and sods’ of jam. Okay, it’s not the tag line of the century!  But making a tea-time treat out of food that you were about to chuck will give you a wonderful feeling of pride.  Happy baking!

(Too much leftover) Jam Thumbprint Cookies

Makes 16-20

Ingredients

35 grams unsalted butter, softened
50 grams caster sugar
1 egg yolk
110g plain flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
Pinch of salt

Tools

Essential

Scales
2 baking trays
Greaseproof paper
Scissors
Dessert spoon
Large mixing bowl
Whisk/fork
Wire cooling rack
Teaspoons
Knife
Chopping board

Time

30m prep
50 minutes making and chilling
A few hours – overnight chilling, if possible
20m baking

Level

Medium

Prep

Remove butter from the fridge
Line the baking sheets/trays with greaseproof paper
Preheat the oven to 180C

Method

In a medium bowl, cream together the butter, sugar and egg yolk
Mix in flour a little bit at a time until a soft dough forms
Chop the dough into half, then each length into 8-10 pieces each
Roll dough into 5cm balls
If dough is too soft, chill for 15 to 20 minutes.  If possible, chill overnight
When ready to bake, place balls 8cm apart on lined baking trays
Use your thumb to make a thumbprint in the centre of each cookie
Fill the hole with 1/2 teaspoon of jam
Place in the oven and bake for 8-10 minutes – check after 8.  If they’re not ready, leave them in
Use your flipper to wriggle onto wire cooling racks
DON’T EAT STRAIGHT OUT OF THE OVEN THE SUGAR WILL BURN YOUR MOUTH TO HOLY HELL.

But, you know, enjoy!

 

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

Leftover busting chocolate ripple no-churn ice-cream

Leftover busting chocolate ripple no-churn ice-cream

Okay, once I learnt about no-churn ice-cream, well, it’s obvious I’m a convert.  There’s so little effort and it’s a perfect way to use up leftover cream and other little nice bits that hang around after Easter and Christmas.

Chocolate orange is one of my favourite flavour combos so get that Easter double cream whipped up with some condensed milk, sprinkle in the chopped up choc and you’ve got pudding sorted for another day. Or just you know eat it tonight.  With extra choc sauce.

Orange choc-chip no-church ice-cream

Inspired by Nigella
Makes 1.5 pints/800ml

Ingredients

300ml double cream
300ml condensed milk (a 397g tin)
1/2 tsp orange essense
Around 150g chocolate

Tools

Measuring jug
Large bowl
Electric whisk/stand mixer OR Balloon whisk and strong arms
Freezer proof container with lid

Time

10m prep 6 hours (at least) to freeze

Method

Chop the chocolate into little pieces with a large knife or food processor
Place the cream, milk and orange essence in the large bowl
Whisk together until there’s lot of little bubbles and the mixture is light and airy
Stir the chocolate through the ice cream
Pour into container
Leave to freeze

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

Leftover beef stew pies

Leftover beef stew pies

Pastry is delicious and pastry is heaven and pastry makes a little go a long way.  Each little pie is plenty full with only a tablespoon of filling.  Have lunchboxes to fill for work and school?  These could be a nice alternative to sandwiches.

As you’re re-heating the meat, these pies will keep nicely in the fridge for a couple of days, but freeze them if you’re not sure when you’re going to be eating them.  Serve with salad or plenty of veg.

Stew pies

Makes 6 little pies

Ingredients

300g leftover stew
225g shortcrust pastry*
Egg
A little flour to roll out pastry/dust the tray

* If making your own pastry: 175g plain flour
80g unsalted butter
pinch of salt
4 teaspoons of water – don’t add it yet!

Prep

Tools

Scales
Sharp knife
Whisk/fork
Baking tray
Kitchen paper

Time

If making pastry:1.5 hours (not all
If not, 50m

Level

So variable!  Harder to advanced

Prep

f using frozen pastry, defrost!
If making your pastry, rub together the butter and flour until sandy. When combined, add a teaspoon of water and see if you can turn it into a ball. Keep adding teaspoon by teaspoon until the pastry comes together
Put in a tupperware/bowl, cover, ad leave in the fridge for half an hour
When you’re ready to bake, take the pastry out of the fridge

Method

Turn oven to 200C
Lighly dust your baking tray with flour
Take the pastry and roll it out until around 3mm thick
Trim the edges off and place to the side
Cut the pastry into 6 rectangles
Taking one rectangle, place a tablespoon full/50-75g of stew on one half of the rectangle
Pull the other half of the rectangle over and squeeze together with your fingertips
Repeat until you’ve got 6 pastries
You might have to re-roll the pastry once to get enough rectangles
Taking your fork, squish the edges together
Place on the baking tray
Brush some beaten egg onto each pastry
Place in the oven and bake for 20m
Serve hot, or, if storing place on a wire rack until room temperature.
Store in a lidded container for up to 3 days in the fridge, or a couple of months in the freezer.

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

Leftover busting chocolate sauce

Leftover busting chocolate sauce

The problem with a houseful of leftover Easter chocolate varied; a lot of it is crap.  Half of it you don’t like but you know that you shouldn’t waste chocolate.  The crop is precious, as is sugar and milk.

Looking for a simple solution?  Be like my bestie’s mum and get your random choc, chop it up, pour in a little milk and microwave/heat on the hob.

Your choc sauce will make a decadent hot chocolate or drizzle it over some no churn ice-cream.  Any crunch mini egg shells should melt away; if your sauce is too sweet then add in some cocoa powder and rest assured that you’re making the best of your Easter chocolate glut.

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

Leftover jacket potato bake

Leftover jacket potato bake

Aren’t jacket potatoes great?  My life, in all seriousness and smallness, was changed when my ex’s mum stared at my gormless face as she pulled teeny, tiny jacket potatoes out of the oven.  “It’s a way of cooking, not a size” she tutted.  What a revelation: now jacket potatoes could be part of my meal, not the backbone to carry beans and cheese/cheese and sweetcorn/tuna mayo.  Though I love these, maybe a little too much – but now I could have jacket potatoes more often.

 

With lucky timing for comfort food padding as we all contend with the Beast from the East, let’s get using up our jacket potatoes that might be sitting around, needing some love.  There’s got to be more ideas that a bubble or a hash, love them as I do… well, time for some StorrCupboard magic.

 

(Note: this Rachel Roddy pizza is a brilliant vessel for a solitary spud.  It does, I think, need a fresh pizza base, so I didn’t post it as an option that everyone would try.  And I pointed you guys to a pizza last week. So consider this a double carb bonus  … Also: the mixed root veg cakes from a few weeks back are traditionally plain potato cakes, and would work well, too).

So, I know that this isn’t super quick but we are talking potatoes here. So, this is relative…

Bahahaaaa I haven’t told my kids there’s mash potato in their cake!  Think carrot cake: that’s not weird is it?  And a drizzle cake is *supposed* to be dense, zingy and this one certainly is.

 

This recipe calls for mash, but that’s not essential – just mash up your leftover jackets.  I didn’t have quite enough potato, so added some extra flour, and it just fine (I don’t need cake to be gluten free, but some GF flour would be fine, too).

 

I had one blood orange, one lemon and two limes in the fridge, so that’s why my cake is a pretty pink colour.  And tastes great.

Potatoes a la Poulette

Serves 4
Adapted, barely, from ‘I Can Cook’, Ginette Mathiot, p568

Ingredients

EITHER:

30g butter
40g flour
350ml milk
salt and pepper

OR:
1 tub/jar white sauce (around 350ml)

Also:

750 g leftover potatoes
Unsalted butter, for greasing
125g cheese (any; I used cheddar, but anything that melts will work)

Tools

Scales
Chopping board
Knife
Oven-proof dish
Cheese grater

If making white sauce:

Saucepan
Whisk
Wooden spoon

Time

10-30m prep (depends on if you’re making white sauce from scratch)
30-40m to bake

Level:

Easy if you’re using a jar
Medium to tricky if you’re making the sauce/learning to make your own

Prep

Peel the skins off your potatoes
Cut the potatoes into slices about 5mm slices, or just crumble if they’re a bit mashed u
Grate the cheese

White sauce

Place the butter in the saucepan and melt
When melted add the flour and stir together
Add a splash of milk and mix together
When it’s mixed in, add a little more, stirring all the time to avoid lumps forming. If you have a balloon whisk, it’s a lot easier, but a wooden spoon will work just fine
Add a little more milk and keep stirring
When all the milk is added, turn up the heat a little so that the sauce comes to the boil (so that the flour is cooked through, unlike the cheese sauces I made as a lacklustre vegetarian)
Simmer for 5 min
Take off the heat and leave to one side
You may need to give it a vigorous stir before adding to the dish!

Method

Set your oven to 180C
Grease the dish with a little butter/use an old butter paper
Place enough potatoes to make a layer
Pour over half the sauce and half the cheese
Place the other potatoes, and pour over the rest of the sauce and the cheese
Bake for around 30-40m until bubbling and WONDERFUL

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

One sad jacket potato cake

One sad jacket potato cake

Aren’t jacket potatoes great?  My life, in all seriousness and smallness, was changed when my ex’s mum stared at my gormless face as she pulled teeny, tiny jacket potatoes out of the oven.  “It’s a way of cooking, not a size” she tutted.  What a revelation: now jacket potatoes could be part of my meal, not the backbone to carry beans and cheese/cheese and sweetcorn/tuna mayo.  Though I love these, maybe a little too much – but now I could have jacket potatoes more often.

 

With lucky timing for comfort food padding as we all contend with the Beast from the East, let’s get using up our jacket potatoes that might be sitting around, needing some love.  There’s got to be more ideas that a bubble or a hash, love them as I do… well, time for some StorrCupboard magic.

 

(Note: this Rachel Roddy pizza is a brilliant vessel for a solitary spud.  It does, I think, need a fresh pizza base, so I didn’t post it as an option that everyone would try.  And I pointed you guys to a pizza last week. So consider this a double carb bonus  … Also: the mixed root veg cakes from a few weeks back are traditionally plain potato cakes, and would work well, too).

So, I know that this isn’t super quick but we are talking potatoes here. So, this is relative…

Bahahaaaa I haven’t told my kids there’s mash potato in their cake!  Think carrot cake: that’s not weird is it?  And a drizzle cake is *supposed* to be dense, zingy and this one certainly is.

 

This recipe calls for mash, but that’s not essential – just mash up your leftover jackets.  I didn’t have quite enough potato, so added some extra flour, and it just fine (I don’t need cake to be gluten free, but some GF flour would be fine, too).

 

I had one blood orange, one lemon and two limes in the fridge, so that’s why my cake is a pretty pink colour.  And tastes great.

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com