Leftover Veg Fritti

Leftover Veg Fritti

Leftover green bean fritti

Deep frying used to terrify me. Tracey Barlow setting the house on fire. 1990s fat worries. Public safety films.

My ex-husband taught me the ways of deep frying; he grew up with home-made scotch eggs and battered courgettes. Everything’s good fried, right?

Well, yes. A recent Food Programme talked about how deep frying can be part of a healthy diet. Don’t use the same oil too many times. Eat lots of veg. The terribly boring message of ‘all in moderation’ that is realistic yet not headline grabbing.

This Rachel Roddy recipe is amazing and perfect if you have leftover egg whites. I love her instruction to give the cook a beer or a prosecco, and have people sat to take the fritti piece by piece. The first time I did this, and as I drank the prescribed prosecco, I got more and more excited (yes and a little drunk) –  I can deep fry mushrooms! Tiny sausage balls! Leftover spaghetti! Everything was excellent, as is always the way with Rachel’s recipes…

So enjoy deep frying your green beans, and anything else. Enjoy watching the bubbles pop and the crunch of the batter. Don’t be like Tracey, no chip pan fires here, but a happy cook making sure no small leftover are wasted? Perfection.

Battered lovely veggies

Adapted, barely, from Rachel Roddy, 'Five Quarters', p49.
The recipe says it takes a couple of hours; that is only to let the batter rest for an hour.
Prep Time1 hr 20 mins
Cook Time20 mins
Total Time1 hr 40 mins
Author: Ann Storr

Ingredients

  • lots of leftover green beans, mushroom, cauliflower, broccoli...
  • 100 grams plain/strong white flour
  • 50 grams wholemeal flour you can just use 150 grams plain flour; amazingly I didn't have any, and this was a lovely combo
  • 200 ml water
  • pinch salt
  • 2 egg whites
  • little piece of white bread
  • vegetable oil, for frying

Tools

  • 2 bowls
  • scales
  • measuring jug
  • electric whisk, or balloon whisk and strong arms
  • metal spoon for folding egg whites into batter
  • deep saucepan
  • funnel and sieve, and jar for storing deep frying oil for another time

Instructions

About and hour and a half before you want to eat

  • Make the batter by beating the flour, olive oil, pinch of salt and water into a thick cream. Use the electric whisk or your strong arms. Allow to rest in the fridge for at least an hour.

When you're ready to cook (and eat)

  • With a clean bowl and whisk, beat the egg whites into soft peaks. Fold the egg whites through the batter.
  • Pour enough oil into your pan so that you've got about 3-4cm deep. Turn the heat on and after a couple of minutes add the little piece of bread. Once it fizzles and pops, the heat is correct.
  • Dip each green bean in the batter so that it gets a lovely thick coating. Don't fry more than about 7 or 8 at a time.
  • Be like Rachel - hand out little fritte, blowing on them, dipping in a little salt and enjoying a cold beer or prosecco at the same time.

The oil

  • When the oil is cool, get your funnel, jar and little sieve. Place the funnel carefully on the jar and the sieve over (to catch little pieces of batter). Carefully pour the oil into the jar. Label the jar with how many times you have used the oil - after 4 uses it's too heavy in oxygen, will taste stale and saturate more quickly. 

 

Leftover sausage and bacon stuffed potatoes

Servings: 4

Ingredients

  • 4 large potatoes or 8 small...
  • 1 rasher leftover bacon
  • 2 leftover sausages (around 400 grams)
  • 2 eggs
  • 50 grams butter
  • 200 grams cheese

Tools

  • Scales
  • Chopping board
  • Knife
  • Potato masher/fork
  • Whisk/fork
  • Oven-proof dish
  • Dessert spoon
  • Cheese grater
  • Optional: metal skewer

Instructions

Prep

  • Crumble the sausage into small pieces and chop bacon into small pieces

Method

  • Turn the oven to 180c
  • Prick the potatoes all over with a skewer/fork else they will explode!
  • If you have a metal skewers place them through the potatoes, as this conducts the heat through the middle and saves a lot of time and electricity
  • Depending on the size of your potatoes, they will take between 40m & 2 hours... you can start them off in a microwave if you like (WITHOUT the skewer...)

When the potatoes are cooked

  • When the potatoes are squashy to touch, take them out and *carefully* cut into them; try to cut them through their fat side, so it’s easier to fill them/cover with a lot of cheese.
  • PLEASE BE CAREFUL! THERE WILL BE A LOT OF STEAM READY TO GUSH OUT AND STEAM BURNS ARE PAINFUL
  • Scoop all the soft potato into a mixing bowl and break up with a potato masher/fork. Add the crumbled meat, season, and give a good stir
  • Whisk the eggs, and pour into the potato mixture. Stir again.
  • Place the potato skins in the dish. Using a regular eating spoon, put the potato mixture into the potato skins. Grate cheese all over the top.
  • Return to the oven for between 20 & 40m (depending on the size of your potatoes). They are done when they feel firm.

Storage

  • They will keep for a day or two in the fridge. As you have re-heated the meat once already, be careful! Smell and taste, and if you must re-heat ensure that fucker is piping hot all the way through.

Leftover Easter Egg Salted Nut Bark

Leftover Easter Egg Salted Nut Bark

Leftover Easter Egg Salted Nut Bark

Remember when chocolate pretzels came to the UK? I do. I begged my mum to buy them, and eventually she relented. What was this foul salty, salty biscuit combo? Bah, be GONE. I didn’t hear about chocolate and salt again until The Great Salted Caramel Revolution of 2006. Now even Cadbury’s are at it.

One recipe that caught my StorrCupboard leftover radar on my first flick through of Sue’s ‘Cocoa’ book was the chocolate bark. Leftover Easter chocolates and crisps and nuts all used up all at once?! Making a virtue of the hot mess of all those random chocolates? Luckily, I have embraced salt & chocolate. It works because the salt sharpens the other flavours that make up our experience of chocolate. And this works for leftover Easter chocolate (or Christmas, when some weirdos don’t want to eat the strawberry creams or pralines) because you are melting and mixing chocolate and using strong flavours to top the bark.

But, why are we talking about using up all this cheap chocolate? Surely it’s just full of sugar, fat and crap? Well yes – but there’s a lot more to the cost of cocoa that the price of your egg or chocolate bar. Farmers in countries such as Guyana and Equatorial Guinea earn around 78 American Cents a day or less. About 90p a day. Cocoa farming is a difficult skill and farmers are not fairly paid; most are too poor to ever have even tasted chocolate. The situation is too complex for me to write about here but respect the farmer’s work and don’t waste the food. I highly recommend Sue’s book to learn more about the problem. Yf you have a deeper interest, the amazing ‘Bread, Wine, Chocolate’ by Simran Sethi is excellent.

Salty. Crunchy. Easy. A zero-food-waste hoover. Make your chocolate bark to mix up the chocolates you don’t like and respect the work of each farmer along the way.

Leftover Chocolate Bark

Melt up all those annoying chocolates that you don't really like to make this zero waste bark.
Recipe from 'Cocoa' by Sue Quinn, Hardy Grant, p 232

Ingredients

  • at least 100 grams chocolate

Potential toppings; use a total of 10 grams to every 100 grams of chocolate

  • peanuts/any nuts/crisps
  • salt crystals/crushed peppercorns/chilli flakes
  • chopped dried fruit
  • chopped biscuits/biscuit crumbs/dried cake crumbs

Instructions

  • Butter or dampen the baking tray and line with greaseproof paper
  • Chop the chocolate roughly and place into the heatproof bowl
  • Place the saucepan on the hob and bring about 5cm of water to a simmer; place the bowl on the pan and make sure that the bottom of the bowl is not touching the water (lift the bowl up and see if it's wet). If it is, just pour a little water down the sink.
  • Gently stir the chocolate as it melts
  • As the chocolate melts, chop up any of the toppings you're going to use
  • Once the chocolate is melted, pour it into the lined tray and spread it around using your wooden spoon. If you have an off-set spatula, if can help.
  • Sprinkle the toppings over and place in the fridge to set (takes a couple of hours). When totally set cut into shards.

Storage

  • Store at room temperature in a lidded container.

Leftover Easter Egg Hot Chocolate

Leftover Easter Egg Hot Chocolate

Leftover Easter Egg Hot Chocolate

Easter chocolate is its own kind of hell. Lots of little bits and bobs. Lots of little leftovers. Everywhere. From school (when the fuck did teachers start spending their own salaries on chocs for kids??), to grandparents, friends and uncles who know that the biggest Easter eggs are the best Easter Eggs. Of course I give my kids unnecessary Easter Eggs – how could I not?

I was thinking about what you all would love for a little Easter goodness and thought back to last year’s recipes. They’re solid, especially the cheesecake (if I ever meet Ottolenghi…).  But you need more! Happily for us all, Sue Quinn recently published ‘Cocoa: An Exploration of Chocolate, with Recipes’. She kindly gifted me a copy and I spent one afternoon and one Sunday morning reading her words and recipes.

So, how will Sue and I help you to quickly dispatch the Cadbury’s mini eggs and cream eggs and smarties eggs that no-one wants because smarties are smarties and not eggs? Well, first off, your quick quick recipe is for this Spanish inspired hot chocolate. I added more cocoa to counteract the sweetness in milk chocolate and all those shells.

You can dip churros in these, if you like (read: I am not about to make these right now); Sue recommends dipping in salty toast soldiers (oh god). I sipped a little of mine, with extra milk, and intend to drink the whole pot. Like a lady of leisure I shall sip my chocolate, maybe in a bubble path, and thank every last person who gave my children so much chocolate.

 

Leftover chocolate hot chocolate

Barely adapted from 'Cocoa', by Sue Quinn, published by Hardie Grant 2019

Ingredients

  • 45 grams cocoa powder
  • 4 teaspoons cornflour
  • pinch sea salt flakes
  • 500 ml milk
  • 25 grams caster sugar
  • 100 grams leftover chocolate if using a bar of chocolate, grate it; if using up lots of little Easter chocolates, with their hard sugar shells, grind in a food processor/pestle and mortar/bashing them with a rolling pin, between 2 clean tea towels
  • 1 star anise/sprinkle of fresh nutmeg, or a cinnamon stick... Use what you like!
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Tools

  • scales
  • saucepan
  • whisk
  • measuring jug
  • grater/food processor/rolling pin (see note, above)
  • wooden spoon

Instructions

  • Combine the cocoa powder, cornflour and salt in a small bowl
  • Place the milk, sugar, spice and vanilla in a small pan and almost bring to the boil, stirring until the sugar dissolves. Pour enough of the hot liquid into the cocoa powder mixture to make a paste; stir until smooth.
  • While the pan is off the heat, add the chopped chocolate and cocoa paste to the milk. Stir until the chocolate has melted and everything is well combined. Taste - you may want to add more sugar, as I was conservative.
  • Return the pan to a low heat and stir until thick and creamy - use a whisk if you need to get rid of any lumps. Remove any whole spices.
  • If you're planning to use this as hot chocolate you'll need to add additional hot milk or water

Storage

  • This will keep for around a week in the fridge, in a lidded container

Leftover porridge bread

Leftover porridge bread

Leftover Porridge Bread

My eldest brother and I share a love of baking (and eating bread), and I’ve learned a lot from him.  He’s bought me endless books because, chez Storr, all the best presents are rectangles. Learning that a loaf of bread requires only a ratio was eye-opening. So I could use up that remaining 165 grams of brown flour and yesterday’s porridge and top it up with strong bread flour?! Hell. Yes.

If you’ve got 250g of porridge or 100g it doesn’t matter: just make sure that the total weight of porridge & flour is 700g.  That’s it. The amount of salt and yeast will stay the same, the water might vary a little. Got 250 grams of porridge? You might want to go up to a total weight of 800 grams of porridge and flour (8 grams of yeast 16 of salt). It’s that simple. And – poof! – you’ve made something delicious out of a food you were about to waste.

Some people might query adding eggs, flour and fat to what is a cheap ingredient.  Those oats have been sown (ahem). You’ve spent money on them. Soil has been fertilised and petrol burned to transport. So have fun and use that claggy old porridge that you cared to buy and cared to cook to be the inspiration for tomorrow’s lunch. Or toast.

 

Leftover Porridge Bread

Turn cold, claggy, leftover porridge into soft buns
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time20 mins
Proving time3 hrs
Total Time35 mins
Keyword: eating on a budget
Servings: 12 buns

Ingredients

  • up to 200 grams leftover porridge
  • up to 600 grams strong white bread flour (flour + porridge weighs 700 grams)
  • 7 grams fast action yeast
  • 14 grams salt
  • around 400 ml water or milk (it will vary depending on how much porridge goes into your dough)
  • optional: 1 egg

Tools

  • Scales
  • Large mixing bowl
  • Measuring jug
  • Clean tea-towel
  • Roasting tin or oven dish
  • Greaseproof paper
  • Dough scraper or large knife
  • Wire cooling rack

Instructions

  • Weigh the porridge. Then add enough strong bread flour to take the porridge + flour to 700 grams. So, 150 grams porridge + 550 grams flour, for example.
  • Mix the flour, salt and yeast together in the large mixing bowl. Crumble the porridge into the bread flour so that there are no lumps.
  • If using an egg, whisk it into 200ml of the milk/water. Pour this mixture into the flour mixture. Give the ingredients a good mix with a metal spoon. or your hands. It should be quite a wet dough. Add more milk/water until you have a dough where all the flour is fully saturated.
  • Turn the dough out on to a lightly floured or wet surface * and *gently* knead it: push it away from you, pick that end up, pop it back on top, turn the dough 45 degrees and go again. Do this for about 10 minutes, or until you hear pops and crackles coming from the dough - that's the carbon dioxide forming.
  • Cover the dough with a clean, damp tea towel. Leave it to one side for about an hour. The dough need to double in size; in my cold kitchen takes about 2 hours.

Forming the buns

  • Lightly flour the counter and turn the dough out.
  • Weigh the dough; it should weigh around 1.2 kg, ish. Buns are around 100g and I like to weigh the dough. You can just eyeball 12 buns but I find it quicker to just through bits of dough into the scale and make sure that I will have buns of an equal size.
  • Line the oven tin with a piece of greaseproof paper.
  • Lightly flour your counter. Place each piece of dough on the flour. Once you have pieces of dough ready and waiting, take one and form it into a roll by turning it around your hands into a round ball. Tuck each ball into the tin, around 3cm apart.
  • When all the rolls are in the tin, cover with the clean tea towel and leave to rise again for about another half an hour.
  • Turn the oven to 180 degrees.
  • When the rolls have doubled in size, place them gently in the oven and bake for around 20 minutes, or until they are golden brown.
  • When they are cooked, gently slip them out of the tin and leave to cool.

Storage

  • I keep my rolls in a very un-sexy giant tupperware. They will keep fine for a couple of days.
  •  If you want fresh rolls every day, split the rolls and place in the freezer; they will defrost more quickly if you freeze them with the cut in place.
  • * Experienced bakers like to use the wet method where you knead over a wet surface rather than a floured. This is a great technique but takes a little practice.

Leftover porridge muffins

Leftover porridge muffins

Leftover Porridge Muffins

During the ‘lean years’, childcare took most of my 3 figure a month salary. The nursery was necessary but so expensive. I couldn’t not work.  Life was dull. It was 2008. Food prices rose every week. One night, my ex and I went on a rare night out with child-free friends. This may or may not have been the night I found buttons in my purse rather than cash.

I started telling a friend about these amazing leftover porridge muffins that I’d read about and made for my family – “I don’t even waste porridge!”. “But porridge is so cheap!” he replied.  I talked about food waste but really, I was embarrassed to say that I didn’t have the money to be scraping any food in the bin – that I could see the money going into the bin. I couldn’t articulate that any saving like this, where old sad breakfast becomes warm and tasty tea-time, was necessary. I felt humiliated. I didn’t need to, but being skint is humiliating – if you’re there right now, I’m sorry, it’s shit.

As with the porridge pancakes you’ll be amazed at the softness. Use whatever chocolate, fruits or nuts you like/have handy; these are a template to hoover up little leftovers sitting around the cupboard.  I have used milk chocolate because my eldest has a sweet tooth to rival Winnie the Pooh. This batch were walnut and dried raspberry, which I loved.

Those skint years? The nursery was later closed for ‘financial irregularities’. I now have a talented friend who cuts hair for a good price. I no longer wear the maternity coat. I earn better money doing work that I love.  I still don’t waste leftover porridge.

Leftover Porridge Muffins

Based on Oatmeal Muffins by Molly Wizenburg & Amanda Blake Soule
Prep Time20 mins
Cook Time20 mins
Total Time40 mins

Ingredients

  • around 150 grams leftover porridge
  • around 225 grams plain flour
  • 75 grams sugar
  • 4 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 100 grams chocolate, nuts, or dried fruit
  • 1 large egg
  • 120 ml milk
  • 30 grams unsalted butter, melted and cooled

Tools

  • scales
  • mixing bowl
  • measuring jug
  • muffin tin
  • muffin papers
  • whisk/fork
  • ideally, balloon whisk
  • teaspoon/measuring spoon
  • saucepan/oven-proof bowl

Instructions

  • Turn the oven on to 180 degrees. Place the butter in an ovenproof bowl and leave to melt as the oven warms up. Remove from the oven once melted and leave to cool
  • Line a 12 muffin tin with liners or lightly grease
  • Mix the flour, salt, baking powder, sugar and add-ins together in a large bowl
  • Crumble the porridge through the flour mixture to avoid lumps
  • Whisk the egg, milk and butter together
  • Pour the wet mixture into the dry; using a balloon whisk or spoon, mix together with between 8 and 12 strokes
  • Add spoonfuls of batter evenly to the muffin wells and bake for between 15 and 20 minutes
  • Serve warm

Storage

  • These really are best eaten warm and on the day. 
  • Warmed through, and maybe split with a little salted butter, they are good the next day or two - just store them in an airtight container.
  • If you can't eat 12 muffins at once, freeze when at room temperature for up to 3 months.

Leftover porridge pancakes

Leftover porridge pancakes

Leftover Porridge Pancakes

Okay, I hear that, for many of you, scraping up leftover porridge is a step too far. If it does then I suggest, gently, that you don’t have to worry about money. I’m sure you budget, but you don’t panic about the 10p going in the bin. I only had those worries for a couple of years, I was lucky. I don’t worry any longer. But I sure as shit won’t forget it.

Even if you don’t worry about 10p going into the bin, then what about the wasted oats that a farmer or its robots have sown? That farmers have harvested, milled and transported? The milk that the oats have simmered in and the effort it took to feed the cows so they were able to be milked? The honey or syrup that you chose so carefully or quickly from the cupboard? Yeah, don’t be dick. Don’t waste the porridge.

These are my favourite pancake recipe these days.  The oats make the pancakes light, smooth and creamy.  You do need to spend a second to make sure that there are no lumps or oats, so just crumble the leftover porridge though the flour. Then it’s the same as you’d make any American pancake, drop scone or griddle cake.

I made far too much batter for these last week so I wedged some foil on the jug, strapped it into the front seat and took my porridge pancake batter with me to a friends. Luckily her four kids and one of mine made short work of the pancakes.

I love these with a fried egg on top and, sue me, loads of ketchup. Or just butter and Marmite. Marmite with everything. I know. I don’t care. I hope you enjoy your porridge pancakes.

 

Leftover porridge pancakes

Perfect for slightly jammy, syrup-y smooshed up porridge leftovers - these soft, light pancakes will warm your heart, save you pennies and avoid food waste.

Ingredients

  • around 50 grams leftover porridge
  • around 100 grams plain white flour
  • around 125 ml milk
  • 1 egg
  • 2 tablespoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 15 grams melted butter & more for cooking

Tools

  • Measuring jug
  • Scales
  • Mixing bowl
  • Whisk
  • Non-stick or cast-iron frying pan
  • Flipper
  • Spatula

Instructions

  • Weigh your leftover porridge; you don't want more than 50% leftover porridge as it will make the pancakes too soft; if you have more than about 75 grams of leftover porridge, double up the recipe for more, or look at my other leftover porridge recipes
  • Add the salt, sugar and baking powder to the flour
  • Add the flour mixture to the porridge; using your hands or a spoon (preferably hands), rub the porridge through the flour to make sure that there aren't any lumps
  • Milk: how much you need again depends on the ratio of porridge to flour. Start with around 75 ml and whisk the egg into the milk
  • Pour the egg/milk mixture into the porridge mixture and whisk. You want a batter that's quite thick, like white sauce. 
  • I use the pan I'm cooking in to melt the butter; pour the melted butter into the pancake batter, so that the pan is already warm
  • If you need more milk, add it now. You can always add more - sometimes I make one pancake and realise that the batter is too think and pour a little more milk in. Go with a little less milk than you need until you are happy
  • I pour all the mixture back into the measuring jug and pour straight into the pan from there
  • Scrape the sides of the jug until there's nothing left - even a tiny pancake will make someone happy

Cooking the pancakes

  • Turn the pan on to medium hot
  • Add a pinch of butter
  • When the butter sizzles, pour some batter into the pan - around 10cm pancakes are easiest to manage
  • As the pancakes cook, I like to move them a little - ease the spatula under each pancake and just wriggle it around
  • You may need to turn the heat down and up as you go. The pancakes are ready to flip when you see lots of little bubbles
  • Once flipped, the pancake will only need about another minute
  • Place the pancakes on a plate or in a dish and serve warm

Storage

  • Pancakes are best eaten ASAP but you can store these in a lidded container in the fridge, for up to 5 days - I mean they will be edible but stale. Best is to keep the uncooked batter and cook as required. Batter will keep for up to 3 days, absolutely fine