Leftover peas and pasta

Leftover peas and pasta

After all that Easter gluttony, we need some more green goodness. Peas are a huge part of our shopping, our dinners and after school teas.

When I was a kid, one of my brothers and I would eat little pots of frozen peas straight from the freezer (a habit that my youngest has picked up, I’m happy to say).  Peas are so small!  And sweet!  And I usually will just eat them all with a spoon (esp if there’s a little butter and salt on there.

 

But not always, so you can quite often find little Chinese takeaway containers with a couple of handfuls of peas waiting for their starring role…

 

Peas will keep for a couple of days; make sure that they are in a lidded container in the fridge. Do no re-freeze cooked peas.

 

A little pasta; some grated cheese and butter. That’s it.  Cook your pasta as usual; put a couple of tablespoons of the cooking water in a mug then drain the pasta.  Stir the pasta, a little of the water, a teaspoon of butter and the peas together.  If it’s a little dry, add a little more water.  Cover with whatever cheese you have/like and enjoy.

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

Leftover busting chocolate ripple no-churn ice-cream

Leftover busting chocolate ripple no-churn ice-cream

Okay, once I learnt about no-churn ice-cream, well, it’s obvious I’m a convert.  There’s so little effort and it’s a perfect way to use up leftover cream and other little nice bits that hang around after Easter and Christmas.

Chocolate orange is one of my favourite flavour combos so get that Easter double cream whipped up with some condensed milk, sprinkle in the chopped up choc and you’ve got pudding sorted for another day. Or just you know eat it tonight.  With extra choc sauce.

Orange choc-chip no-church ice-cream

Inspired by Nigella
Makes 1.5 pints/800ml

Ingredients

300ml double cream
300ml condensed milk (a 397g tin)
1/2 tsp orange essense
Around 150g chocolate

Tools

Measuring jug
Large bowl
Electric whisk/stand mixer OR Balloon whisk and strong arms
Freezer proof container with lid

Time

10m prep 6 hours (at least) to freeze

Method

Chop the chocolate into little pieces with a large knife or food processor
Place the cream, milk and orange essence in the large bowl
Whisk together until there’s lot of little bubbles and the mixture is light and airy
Stir the chocolate through the ice cream
Pour into container
Leave to freeze

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

Bolognese & tomato sauce

Bolognese & tomato sauce

Bolognese sauce takes time to pop and simmer away; or you’ve bought a jar with it pre-made because life is busy and you prefer jarred sauce.  It’s your dinner, not mine!

Whatever type of sauce – if there’s meat, lentils or quorn in there – that food was grown, harvested, packed and picked.

So what are *you* going to do with that handful of leftover bolognese?  May I suggest making a simple tomato sauce and just adding your strong, delicious, bolgonese to it?  Hardly the thrill of the century but not every meal has to be an event.

A tin of tomatoes costs anything from 40p to around a quid (50C – $1.50), depending on your budget and preference.  So 40p could stop you from chucking out perfectly good food.  Nice!

Finely dice an onion, fry it in a little oil, add the tomatoes.  Turn the heat down and let them bubble and pop, gently.  Once the sauce is nice and thick (around 20 minutes), add your leftover bolognese.  Got some rogue mushrooms in the fridge?  In they go.  Some roast cougettes.  Nice.  Bacon- amazing!

Enjoy a meal that is tasty, has saved food waste and cost you very little cash.  Nice!

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

Leftover yoghurt smoothie

Leftover yoghurt smoothie

I hate strawberry yoghurt.  The strawberry selection pack from 1980s Sainsbury’s was the worst pudding option (aside from my dad announcing “fwesh fwuuut” knowing the sighs and eye-rolls from us – we’d be hoping for Angel Delight or tinned fruit salad).  It’s nothing-y.  It’s boring.  Or peach?!  Vile vile.  Too sweet.
I’ll eat it because it’s there, but there are better ways to turn this “meh” into “a-meh-zing” (sorry).
I love yoghurt smoothies.  To make this just blend 1 pot of yoghurt (about 120g), 200g frozen smoothie pack/your favourite smoothie fruits & milk to dilute (around 100ml, but it depends on the thickness of the yoghurt and the milk).  You can’t really taste the yoghurt so it’s a great way of using up/disguising a flavour that’s your most hated/least loved.
When choosing fruit think about flavours that will go nicely – berries with berries,berries with bananas – TBF, bananas with most fruit yoghurts.  It’s just going to be a happy, fruity, creamy drink.  Like Yop.  Homemade Yop.
An immersion/stick blender is your friend, and only about a tenner to buy.  Any manky bananas/grapes/kiwis etc can be made into a smoothie in minutes, without the outlay into a juicer etc. As it’s small, you can store it in a drawer.  Soup, smoothies and smooth pasta/pizza sauces: you won’t regret it.

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

Leftover yoghurt ice-cream

Leftover yoghurt ice-cream

Okay this is a new obsession.  I wouldn’t have gone near condensed milk a couple of years ago – high sugar and all that.  But I did buy ice-cream so … yeah, I know it doesn’t make sense.  Hell, who of us is all logic?
This isn’t a frozen yoghurt because of, you know, the cream. Most frozen yoghurts are made with thick greek yoghurt, which is higher in fat than regular yoghurt, so that’s why I added the cream.
This so simple recipe will banish that no-good peach yoghurt from the back of the fridge transform it into a pudding that everyone wants.  Plus it’s a good big almost-litre of ice-cream for about £2.50, and tastes as good/better as any Haagen-Dasz or Ben & Jerry’s, and a damn sight cheaper.

 

No-churn frozen yoghurt

Based on Simply Nigella No-churn Coffee ice-cream
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time4 hrs
Total Time4 hrs 10 mins
Course: Dessert
Author: Ann Storr

Ingredients

  • 1 tub (300ml) any yoghurt
  • 250 ml double cream
  • 175 ml condensed milk

Tools

  • Measuring jug
  • Large bowl
  • Electric whisk/stand mixer OR hand whisk and strong arms
  • Freezer proof container with lid

Instructions

  • Place the ingredients (aside from Treat) in the large bowl
  • Whisk together until there’s lot of little bubbles and the mixture is light and airy
  • Pour into container
  • If using, drizzle some sauce around the ice-cream and use a skewer/sharp knife to ripple it around
  • Place lid on and put in freezer
  • Seriously, that’s it

 

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

Brown Banana Bites

Brown Banana Bites

In a previous life I was lucky enough to go on a work jolly to South California (I KNOW). It was, pretty much, the only one over the course of eleven under-paid years, and it was amazing.  Beach motel: check.  Early morning beach walk and watching dolphins frollic in the sea: check.  Putting on half a stone in a week: check.

Not kidding.  Half a stone.  In a week.

 

On the plus side, I learnt that frozen bananas on a stick is a real thing in SoCal.  Be still my British heart.  I thought it was all ‘Arrested Development’ nonsense.

 

These little banana bites are quite messy to make but that’s half the fun.  It’s a good way to use up leftover birthday cake sprinkles, a couple of discarded biscuits or hundreds and thousands.  Use whatever chocolate you like.  I didn’t use coconut oil because it’s damned pricey and I don’t really like it TBH, so I went for butter.  Budget-conscious vegans could use groundbut (i.e., flavourless) oil and it’ll be fine.

 

Crunchy, smooth and not too sweet. Yum.​​

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com