Rice Pudding

Rice Pudding

Rice pudding from worrisome milk

Years ago, I worked with a wonderful woman called Jadz. We worked on the same study at the Institute of Psychiatry, looking at how nature and nuture affect behaviour. I’d feel insecure that my colleagues were all researchers and academics, when I was ‘just’ comms and business. I talked more about food and fashion than stats and theories, and got my boss to bring me copies of American Vogue (one time it was a record breaking September edition…). It’s lucky that I moved industries, right?

Jadz told me how her mum would make bowls of rice pudding as a special breakfast. She smiled as she said it, in that time-warp way that some memories have. I went home and made a batch for my eldest, and she was in heaven.

Nowadays, I make my eldest rice pudding for breakfast when I know she’s got a rough day ahead. After 11 years on a nature X nuture study, the armchair psychologist in me says that nature (child and grandchild of comfort feeders) + nurture (erm, child and grandchild of comfort feeders) means there’s going to be rice pudding for breakfast for years to come, thank you Jadz.

Note

Rice pudding will keep for a couple of days, but if you have any scrapings leftover, whack them into a pancake batter or bread dough – remember it’s all about relay race cooking, where one ‘leftover’ sparks a new idea.

Rice pudding

You can use pudding rice, but I have a giant bag of arborio rice that my bestie sent me from Italy. Short grain would even be fine at a push.
Servings: 2

Ingredients

  • 500 ml leftover milk cow/goat/soy/coconut
  • 50 grams pudding or risotto rice
  • 25 grams unsalted butter or vegan alternative
  • 25 grams sugar
  • pinch salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla essence (optional)

Tools

  • Scales
  • Measuring jug
  • Saucepan with lid
  • Sieve
  • Wooden spoon

Ratio

    1 part rice to 10 parts milk: if you have 250 ml of milk to use up, it's 25 grams of rice. 1 litre? 100 grams of rice.

      Instructions

      • Weigh the rice, place it in the sieve and rinse. Allow to drain.
      • Add the milk, rice, butter, sugar and salt to the pan. Turn the heat to medium, place the lid on and bring to the boil.
      • Milk can boil over VERY QUICKLY so don't walk away!
      • Once it is simmering, turn the heat down. Stir every 10 minutes of so until done - around 30 minutes.
      • Serve on its own or with jam

      Storage

      • If there is any leftover, then place in a lidded container in the fridge. You can mash any leftover rice pudding that no-one wants into bread dough or pancake batter.

      Leftover Mushrooms with Scrambled Eggs

      Leftover Mushrooms with Scrambled Eggs

      Leftover mushrooms

      90% of the mushrooms we eat in the world are good old button mushrooms. Cheap, easy to cultivate all year round, a nice little package. They’re the 3rd most chosen veg, after potatoes and tomatoes. So why, then, when I was at Wellness HQ in Tunbridge Wells (giving the first EVER StorrCupboard talk), did everyone tell me that leftover mushrooms were a problem?

      I think it’s because mushrooms are so easy but, because of their strong flavour and hard shape, we get used to thinking “mushrooms are only for breakfast” or “mushrooms go with steak”. So when I say to people “how about mushrooms on toast for lunch?” I often get an “ohhhhhh, yeah of COURSE” reaction. We have our habits that make life more simple. But sometimes those habits leave us blindsided and not seeing the ingredient sitting in front of us.

      This recipe is barely adapted from the latest Honey & Co cookbook. If you’ve not heard of the Honies but you like good food, then you’re in for a treat. Sarit and Itamar’s Palestinian and Israeli cooking is superb, their recipes a delight. I don’t know them but a few weeks ago I was having a coffee in the deli and saw them leaving with trays and boxes of food for some lucky customer. They are always hugging and the love they have for each other seems to come across in their food. These indulgent mushroom eggs are heavenly. Don’t miss out the cinnamon. It sounds odd if you’re not used to it but the warmth of the cinnamon is just lovely. And if you can afford a tenner on a lunch and you can get to Fitzrovia then good god do it. The cookies are to die for.

      Leftover mushrooms can be the springboard ingredient to a full-flavoured, incidentally vegetarian feast.

      Leftover mushrooms with scrambled eggs

      Adapted, barely, from 'Honey and Co at Home', p27
      Prep Time10 mins
      Cook Time20 mins
      Total Time30 mins
      Servings: 2 people

      Ingredients

      • 25 grams unsalted butter
      • 1 tablespoon olive oil
      • 1 large leek or a couple of shallots, or a few spring onions
      • 2 cloves garlic
      • around 250 grams mushrooms
      • 1/2 teaspoon salt
      • pinch cinnamon
      • 1 small bundle fresh thyme twigs, tied together with string
      • 4 eggs
      • 50 grams Italian hard cheese
      • 50 ml cream or milk
      • freshly ground black pepper

      Tools

      • Knife and chopping board
      • Mixing bowl
      • Cheese grater
      • Large frying pan/wok
      • Measuring jug
      • Garlic crusher (optional)

      Instructions

      Prep

      • Slice the mushrooms into similar sized slices. Clean and halve the leek, and cut into 5mm-ish slices. If using spring onions, cut into rounds or if using shallots cut into dice. Crush the garlic with a little salt or a garlic crusher.
      • Measure the milk or cream. Add the eggs and cheese and a little seasoning. Whisk together and set to one side.

      Cooking

      • Turn the heat to about medium and add the oil and butter. Once the fats are foaming add the mushrooms, leek/onion and garlic, turn the heat to high and mix well. Next add the salt, pinch on cinnamon and thyme bundle and mix well. 
      • Season with plenty of black pepper. Stir off and on for about 10 minutes, until a lot of water has evaporated from the mushrooms. Once they are cooked through and wilted remove the thyme. 
      • If you're cooking for a crowd or in advance, then leave the mushrooms at this stage and only add the eggs when you are almost ready to eat.
      • When you are almost ready to eat, if you need to heat the pan back up, do it. If the pan is still warm, pour the egg/cream/cheese mixture into the mushrooms. Allow the eggs to set for a minute and then stir again.
      • Repeat this until the eggs are cooked to the set that you like (I'm on the dry end of the spectrum...)

      Storage

      • If you don't eat them all, store them in a lidded container for up to 5 days. Reheating isn't a great idea as they will go rubbery. Stir them through some rice or whack in a sandwich with plenty of sriracha.

      Leftover Green Beans with Pasta and Pesto

      Leftover Green Beans with Pasta and Pesto

      I love green beans but they are a problematic veggie. We’re so used to having them week in and out when, really, they need a lot of warmth to grow. We don’t have a lot of warmth in the UK. So, if you’re going to be buying a packet of green beans that have been flown in from Kenya, then for fuck’s sake do not waste a single one.

      This is a riff on a classic late-spring Italian recipe; green beans with pasta, potatoes and pesto. That’s it. It’s real cucina-di-povera. Yes it’s double carb but just, you know, don’t be greedy. If you can be bothered, cut the potatoes and beans so that they are a similar length to the pasta.

      If you have an errant salad pack or bag of baby leaf spinach sitting in your fridge, then make your own pesto! Okay it’s not a stunning jar of authentic basil/pine nut/parmesan pesto but, remember the roots of pesto: people making the most of what they have around them every day.

      A handful of green beans can be the inspiration behind tonight’s supper, and I hope you enjoy making sure there’s never a leftover, leftover.

       

      Leftover Green Beans with Pasta and Pesto

      Prep Time5 mins
      Cook Time30 mins
      Total Time35 mins
      Servings: 4

      Ingredients

      • leftover green beans
      • 200 grams short pasta, such as fusilli or penne you can use anything, it's just nice to have the food a similar size
      • 200 grams salad potatoes
      • few tablespoons pesto

      Tools

      • Scales
      • Slotted spoon/tongs
      • Knife & chopping board
      • Saucepan with lid
      • Colander/sieve
      • Spoon
      • Mixing bowl

      Instructions

      Optional: make the pesto using this recipe

      • Rinse the potatoes and place in the pan and cover with cold water. Add a teaspoon of salt. Cover with the lid and bring to the boil
      • If your potatoes are lots of different sizes, or you just need to cook very quickly, you can cut them into smaller pieces.
      • Whilst the potatoes are cooking, cut the green beans to a similar length to the pasta.
      • Check for 'done-ness' - depending on the size they'll be ready in anything between 20 and 30 minutes.
      • When they are soft, remove from the boiling water with a slotted spoon/tongs and place in the bowl. Do not drain the water. Stir pesto through the potatoes whilst warm.
      • Get the water boiling again and cook the pasta; check it 2 minutes before the packet suggests as sometimes they aren't quite accurate.
      • When the pasta is done, again remove with a slotted spoon and add to the pesto and potatoes.
      • Boil the beans in the potato pasta water. Remove when done, around 4 minutes.
      • Add more pesto if you wish (I like a lot) and serve.

      Storage

      • This will keep in a lidded container, in your fridge, for up to 5 days, although it'll be better within a day or two of cooking.

      Leftover Celery Salad

      Leftover Celery Salad

      Leftover celery salad

      Love it, hate it; celery is a backbone of many recipes because of its strong flavour. But if you’ve bought a head of celery for your Bolognese or Jambalaya, what to do with all the leftovers?

      If you really hate celery, you can slice and freeze it; this means one head will last you months, saving you money and food waste.

      For the celery lovers out there, this salad will make you v happy. A simple blue cheese dressing + green stuff + walnuts (toasted if you can be bothered) will plough through two sticks of celery per person. If you’d like to make a nod to a classic Waldorf salad, chuck in an eating apple, diced. Got some avocado that wants eating up? It would be perfect in this. It’s a nod to American chop salads and, really what got me into eating salads for lunch because I found that I was full and had energy for the afternoon ahead.

      Punchy and strong, this is what my 80s childhood iceburg, cucumber and tomato salads weren’t, and I hope you enjoy this.

      Leftover celery salad

      Chop up that peppery celery and mix it with other strong flavours to make the perfect, waste busting, light lunch
      Prep Time10 mins
      Cook Time5 mins
      Total Time15 mins
      Servings: 1
      Author: Ann Storr

      Ingredients

      • 2 stalks leftover celery ideally not too soft yet - if it is, you'll want to cook it up
      • 2 handfuls lettuce or salad leaves, washed and dried
      • 100 grams or so other stuff- I used cucumber, but chuck in any greens, avocado...
      • 50 grams walnut pieces you can use walnut halves but pieces are much cheaper

      Blue cheese dressing

      • 2 heaped tablespoons mayonnaise
      • 50 grams blue cheese

      Tools

      • Baking tray
      • Scales (or you can eyeball, it is a salad)
      • Colander & salad spinner/clean tea towel
      • Chopping board
      • Knife
      • Mixing bowl
      • Whisk

      Instructions

      • Optional: Turn the oven to 180C and place the walnuts on a baking tray. Place in the warmed oven and toast for about 8 minutes, keeping a close eye on the time. Once toasted, remove from the oven place to one side.
      • If preferred/you're pushed for time, don't toast your nuts
      • Whisk the blue cheese and mayo together in a bowl. I like to leave some lumps as I like texture in a salad, you may prefer it smooth, up to you
      • Cut the celery up and mix with the veg. Mix the dressing into the veg and taste for seasoning, adding salt and black pepper to taste.
      • Add the walnuts and eat!

      Leftover peas and pasta

      Leftover peas and pasta

      After all that Easter gluttony, we need some more green goodness. Peas are a huge part of our shopping, our dinners and after school teas.

      When I was a kid, one of my brothers and I would eat little pots of frozen peas straight from the freezer (a habit that my youngest has picked up, I’m happy to say).  Peas are so small!  And sweet!  And I usually will just eat them all with a spoon (esp if there’s a little butter and salt on there.

       

      But not always, so you can quite often find little Chinese takeaway containers with a couple of handfuls of peas waiting for their starring role…

       

      Peas will keep for a couple of days; make sure that they are in a lidded container in the fridge. Do no re-freeze cooked peas.

       

      A little pasta; some grated cheese and butter. That’s it.  Cook your pasta as usual; put a couple of tablespoons of the cooking water in a mug then drain the pasta.  Stir the pasta, a little of the water, a teaspoon of butter and the peas together.  If it’s a little dry, add a little more water.  Cover with whatever cheese you have/like and enjoy.

      Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

      ann@storrcupboard.com

      Leftover busting chocolate ripple no-churn ice-cream

      Leftover busting chocolate ripple no-churn ice-cream

      Okay, once I learnt about no-churn ice-cream, well, it’s obvious I’m a convert.  There’s so little effort and it’s a perfect way to use up leftover cream and other little nice bits that hang around after Easter and Christmas.

      Chocolate orange is one of my favourite flavour combos so get that Easter double cream whipped up with some condensed milk, sprinkle in the chopped up choc and you’ve got pudding sorted for another day. Or just you know eat it tonight.  With extra choc sauce.

      Orange choc-chip no-church ice-cream

      Inspired by Nigella
      Makes 1.5 pints/800ml

      Ingredients

      300ml double cream
      300ml condensed milk (a 397g tin)
      1/2 tsp orange essense
      Around 150g chocolate

      Tools

      Measuring jug
      Large bowl
      Electric whisk/stand mixer OR Balloon whisk and strong arms
      Freezer proof container with lid

      Time

      10m prep 6 hours (at least) to freeze

      Method

      Chop the chocolate into little pieces with a large knife or food processor
      Place the cream, milk and orange essence in the large bowl
      Whisk together until there’s lot of little bubbles and the mixture is light and airy
      Stir the chocolate through the ice cream
      Pour into container
      Leave to freeze

      Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

      ann@storrcupboard.com