Pea fritters

Pea fritters

I love a fritter.  Basically a more filling pancake.  With a poached or fried egg you’ve got a light meal, or as an alternative to chips or a jacket potato with your sausages. Got sweetcorn and peas?  Would totally work – just use the same total weight of veg.

Pea fritters

Serves 4
Based on Jane Baxter for Riverford

Ingredients

100g thawed/leftover peas
75g plain flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon sugar
1 egg
65ml milk
1 tablespoon of butter
1/2 red chilli/1/2 teaspoon chilli flakes (optional)
6 spring onions
1/2 tablespoon fresh parsley or chives (optional)
salt & pepper
Vegetable/sunflower oil for frying

Tools

Scales
Sharp knife
Whisk/fork
Mixing bowl
Measuring jug
Frying pan
Flipper
Skewer

Time

30 minutes

Level

Medium

Prep

If your peas are frozen, leave to defrost
Finely chop the chilli (if using a fresh one)
Slice the dark green tops off the spring onions (if you ever make stock, chuck them in a bag for another day; otherwise chuck). Cut the white and pale green parts of the onion into rounds

Method

Put flour, baking powder and sugar into a bowl
Add egg and beat in
Gradually beat the milk in with a whisk until you get a thick, smooth batter
Melt half the butter in a saucepan
Pour the melted butter into the mixture
Add chilli (optional), herbs (optional), onions and peas to the batter and season well with plenty of salt and pepper
Heat the veg oil and a pinch of the butter in a frying pan until quite hot
Drop tablespoons of mixture into the frying pan and fry over a medium heat for about 2 minutes
You’ll see that the fritter looks a bit set, and a few bubbles will appear: that’s good!
Flip it to the other side; it’ll probably be a bit splatty on the bottom but that’s okay
Cook for another 2-3 minutes
If you’re not sure if it’s cooked, stick the point of a sharp knife or skewer into the middle; if it’s clean it’s cooked, if not, it’s not!
If it’s not cooked and you’re worried that it’s burning, flip back to the first side and give it another minute or so. You might want to turn the heat down
Pop to one side and repeat until you have used all the mixture
Serve with eggs and bacon for brunch, or as an alternative to your mash or jacket potato

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

One sad jacket potato cake

One sad jacket potato cake

Aren’t jacket potatoes great?  My life, in all seriousness and smallness, was changed when my ex’s mum stared at my gormless face as she pulled teeny, tiny jacket potatoes out of the oven.  “It’s a way of cooking, not a size” she tutted.  What a revelation: now jacket potatoes could be part of my meal, not the backbone to carry beans and cheese/cheese and sweetcorn/tuna mayo.  Though I love these, maybe a little too much – but now I could have jacket potatoes more often.

 

With lucky timing for comfort food padding as we all contend with the Beast from the East, let’s get using up our jacket potatoes that might be sitting around, needing some love.  There’s got to be more ideas that a bubble or a hash, love them as I do… well, time for some StorrCupboard magic.

 

(Note: this Rachel Roddy pizza is a brilliant vessel for a solitary spud.  It does, I think, need a fresh pizza base, so I didn’t post it as an option that everyone would try.  And I pointed you guys to a pizza last week. So consider this a double carb bonus  … Also: the mixed root veg cakes from a few weeks back are traditionally plain potato cakes, and would work well, too).

So, I know that this isn’t super quick but we are talking potatoes here. So, this is relative…

Bahahaaaa I haven’t told my kids there’s mash potato in their cake!  Think carrot cake: that’s not weird is it?  And a drizzle cake is *supposed* to be dense, zingy and this one certainly is.

 

This recipe calls for mash, but that’s not essential – just mash up your leftover jackets.  I didn’t have quite enough potato, so added some extra flour, and it just fine (I don’t need cake to be gluten free, but some GF flour would be fine, too).

 

I had one blood orange, one lemon and two limes in the fridge, so that’s why my cake is a pretty pink colour.  And tastes great.

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

Leftover yoghurt smoothie

Leftover yoghurt smoothie

I hate strawberry yoghurt.  The strawberry selection pack from 1980s Sainsbury’s was the worst pudding option (aside from my dad announcing “fwesh fwuuut” knowing the sighs and eye-rolls from us – we’d be hoping for Angel Delight or tinned fruit salad).  It’s nothing-y.  It’s boring.  Or peach?!  Vile vile.  Too sweet.
I’ll eat it because it’s there, but there are better ways to turn this “meh” into “a-meh-zing” (sorry).
I love yoghurt smoothies.  To make this just blend 1 pot of yoghurt (about 120g), 200g frozen smoothie pack/your favourite smoothie fruits & milk to dilute (around 100ml, but it depends on the thickness of the yoghurt and the milk).  You can’t really taste the yoghurt so it’s a great way of using up/disguising a flavour that’s your most hated/least loved.
When choosing fruit think about flavours that will go nicely – berries with berries,berries with bananas – TBF, bananas with most fruit yoghurts.  It’s just going to be a happy, fruity, creamy drink.  Like Yop.  Homemade Yop.
An immersion/stick blender is your friend, and only about a tenner to buy.  Any manky bananas/grapes/kiwis etc can be made into a smoothie in minutes, without the outlay into a juicer etc. As it’s small, you can store it in a drawer.  Soup, smoothies and smooth pasta/pizza sauces: you won’t regret it.

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

Leftover yoghurt cake

Leftover yoghurt cake

I first came across this recipe years back and have gone back to it time and time again. It’s a classic French recipe;  simple and tasty. It’s said to be one the first recipes that French children make, because of its simplicity.  So, if you’re new to baking, give it a try.  The flavour of the yoghurt will come through a little, but not like “Oh gawd this is a strawberry cake!”, more, “Did you try something different?  Is there a little bit of different sugar?” type of different.
You can easily double up if you’ve got 2 pots; if you’ve got 2 flavours in the fridge and they’re similar, go for it.  So, raspberry and strawberry: yes.  Apricot and peach: yes.  Blackcurrant and peach: no, too different.
If you’re new to baking this is a great cake to start with: there’s no butter to soften, and it’s quite quick.  The blueberries are optional but I think work well.
There isn’t much baking powder in this because the acid in the yoghurt mixes with the bicarbonate of soda to create the rise.Like a muffin, be careful to mix the cake *gently*, to keep the texture soft.
This cake is a breakfast option Chez Storr.  My feeling is that, as long as it’s healthier than a bowl of Frosties, you can have it.  So it was cake for brekkie this morning (with the smoothie, yes!).

Yoghurt Cake

Ingredients

185g plain flour 1tsp baking powder 1/2 tsp bicarbonate of soda Pinch salt 1 egg 85g caster OR light brown sugar 75ml sunflower oil 1 pot yoghurt (mine are 120g pots) 1tsp vanilla essence

Optional: 100g blueberries, fresh or defrosted

Tools

Scales
Two large mixing bowls
Measuring jug
7 inch cake tin
Fork
Balloon
Whisk
Greaseproof paper
Scissors
Teaspoon
Wire cooling rack

Optional/Helpful

Electric whisk/stand mixer Measuring spoons

Time

10m prep 25m cook 30-40 baking

Level

Simple if you bake
A good starter if you’re new to baking

Prep

Line the bottom of your cake tin with greaseproof paper
Turn the oven to 180C

Method

Whisk/sift together the flour, baking powder, bicarb and salt into a large bowl and set aside

In a smaller bowl, whisk together the oil. egg and sugar.  Using an electric or stand mixer, you’ll want to keep going for about 2 minutes until the mixture is really creamy.  With a balloon whisk, it’s around 6 minutes/arm hanging off.

Add the yoghurt the the wet mixture and whisk until combined.

Pour the wet mixture into the dry.

Using the balloon whisk, GENTLY stir the wet mixture into the dry.

If using, add blueberries when the mixture is just ready.

Pour into the lined tin and place in the oven.

Check at 30m.  The cake is done when well risen, beautifully brown and a cake tester/skewer comes out clean.

Leave to sit on a wire rack for 10m in its tin before removing.

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

(Brown) Banana and nut butter smoothie

(Brown) Banana and nut butter smoothie

Anyone who’s looked at my feeds knows I love a good banana bread.  Specifically Nigella’s from ‘How to be a Domestic Goddess’ – dense, sweet, keeps well, uses two bowls.  Yes, another recipe where the pages are crusted and have strings of banana dried on.  Yummy.

 

But there’s got to be more ways with a browning nana than a banana bread, and given how my youngest will sometimes eat 3 in a day (I know) to zero in a week … well, I’ve got some practice.

 

Waaaaa….​​

 

Banana peanut butter smoothie

 

Quick.  Cheap.  Currently believed to be healthy.  Delicious.  Frugal.  So basically yeah, love em.

 

You don’t have to add the yoghurt and oats, but we sometimes have these as breakfast, so the oats help to keep you going.  Or leave them out, I’m not checking am I?

 

Blend the bananas first; I used to add extra sugar but if you blend the bananas alone, first, then it’s unecessary – and that’s some ££ saved, hoorah.

 

Sweet, cheap and filling banana smoothie​​

Banana and nut butter smoothie

Serves 2 kids or 1 adult

Ingredients

1 large banana (about 190g with peel on)
40g nut butter
40g yoghurt (cow or vegan)
20g small oats
150ml milk/milk alternative

Tools

Knife
Spoons
Stick blender/smoothie maker

Time

10 minutes max

Level

Easy

Prep

Remove bananas from freezer if necessary

Method

Blend banana on its own

Add nut butter and blend

Next oats (if using) and yoghurt.  Make sure it’s really smooth

Add milk until it’s the right texture for you (I like mine thin, but with the odd bonus lump of peanut butter…)

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com