Dosas, for every little leftover curry

Dosas, for every little leftover curry

Dosas, a love story

Tomorrow is a big day for StorrCupboard: the first StorrCupboard Food Waste workshop. Quite nervous. I’ve been putting a lot of background work into StorrCupboard so I’m often running to chase my tail. So I’m writing this just ahead of hitting send, on this blustery Sunday morning. Tomorrow I’ll be cooking dosas with 12 members of the public, learning how to be food savvy with the wonderful people of Hubbub charity. I can’t wait and I’m terrified all at once.

Dosas aren’t simple to learn. There’s a practice needed in learning the right grain to achieve and you do need a food processor, sorry. If you like the idea, then a basic gram flour ‘dosa’ will be similar but won’t have the same flavour. But it will allow you to clear your plate.

The batter is lightly fermented, so if gut health and fermentation are of interest to you then it’s well worth having a go. It took me a couple of goes to get anything that I’d even serve to my kids, so there’s been a lot of eating soggy batter!

The ground rice/lentil/fenugreek mixture has to look like thick cream, that’s the only way I can explain it. Then you loosen it, until it’s like English pancake batter – worryingly loose is how I think about it.

I loved learning to make these and pushing myself to keep on experimenting, learning. I hope you enjoy this recipe.

PS this is a lovely piece

 

Dosas

Author: Ann Storr

Ingredients

  • 375 grams basmati rice
  • 125 grams urad daal (split, skinless black gram)
  • 3/4 teaspoon fenugreek seeds
  • salt to taste
  • Vegetable oil

Tools

  • Sieve
  • Scales
  • Large Bowl
  • Clean tea towel
  • Food Processor
  • Non stick or cast iron frying pan
  • Flipper
  • Ladle or coffee cup
  • Plate

Instructions

The night before

  • Wash the rice and urad daal well. Add the fenugreek seeds to the mix and fill enough water in the rice-daal bowl to cover them about 2-inch deep. Soak overnight.

8 hours before you want to cook

  • Drain all the water from the rice mixture. Now put into the food processor and grind - adding very little water if necessary - to a smooth yet slightly grainy paste
  • When you are happy with the texture, put it into a large mixing bowl and add enough water to make a batter. The consistency of the batter should be such that it thickly coats the back of a spoon - to me like English pancake batter
  • Now add salt to taste and keep the dosa batter aside in a warm, dark spot, covered, for 6 to 8 hours. During this time it will ferment

Cooking the dosas

  • Pour a little oil into the pan and tilt it to cover the base
  • Fill the ladle up to the 3/4 level with dosa batter. Gently pour this batter onto the centre of the pan - just as you would for a pancake
  • Now begin to spread the batter in sweeping circular motions to cover the base of the frying pan. The dosa may have little holes- this is normal
  • When the upper surface begins to look cooked (it will no longer look soft or runny), flip the dosa. By this time, ideally, the surface that was underneath should be light golden in colour. Cook for 1 minute after flipping.
  • The dosa is almost done. Fold it in half and allow to cook for 30 seconds more

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

Leftover peas and pasta

Leftover peas and pasta

After all that Easter gluttony, we need some more green goodness. Peas are a huge part of our shopping, our dinners and after school teas.

When I was a kid, one of my brothers and I would eat little pots of frozen peas straight from the freezer (a habit that my youngest has picked up, I’m happy to say).  Peas are so small!  And sweet!  And I usually will just eat them all with a spoon (esp if there’s a little butter and salt on there.

 

But not always, so you can quite often find little Chinese takeaway containers with a couple of handfuls of peas waiting for their starring role…

 

Peas will keep for a couple of days; make sure that they are in a lidded container in the fridge. Do no re-freeze cooked peas.

 

A little pasta; some grated cheese and butter. That’s it.  Cook your pasta as usual; put a couple of tablespoons of the cooking water in a mug then drain the pasta.  Stir the pasta, a little of the water, a teaspoon of butter and the peas together.  If it’s a little dry, add a little more water.  Cover with whatever cheese you have/like and enjoy.

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

Jam-Jar Scraping Glazed Ham

Jam-Jar Scraping Glazed Ham

What makes something an ingredient you’ll use in a sweet recipe or a savoury?  Habit?  Taste?

I love a Nigel Slater recipe; all cuddly and calm.  He inspired this recipe.  Faced with some tail ends of raspberry or blackcurrant jam, it’s a simple way to make sure you don’t waste anything.

Glazing a ham with jam might seem a stretch too far. But! the sweet, caramelised finish will change your mind.  Not sure?  Like redcurrant jelly with your lamb?  Apple sauce with pork?  Honey glazed ham?  I guarantee that this is worth trying. The sugar in the jam caramelises with the fat from the ham for a sweet, salty – well basically it’s your hangover’s best friend (that or some salt and vinegar crisps and an ice cold can of coke).

Jam glazed ham

Feeds 4 with leftovers

Ingredients

2kg* unsmoked gammon
2 large carrots
1 onion or 2 leek tops
1 stick celery
6 peppercorns
Bay leafAround 50g jam

* You can use a smaller piece: 1kg cooking time: 1hour 20m 1.5kg cooking time: 1hour 45 mins
So: 20 minutes for every 450g plus an additional 20 minutes; so a 2.765kg of ham would be 2 hours + 20 minutes

Tools
Essential

Scales
Large bowl
Chopping board
Large, sharp knife
Saucepan and lid, big enough to fit gammon & vegetables
Metal or wooden spoon
Meat forks (something to get gammon out of the pan)
Carving tray/chopping board
Colander
Scissors
Roasting tin
Pastry brush
Fork/little whisk
Small bowl
Pickle jar/big tupperware to store the leftover stock
Big tupperware for the meat

Time

Overnight soak/30m to par-boil
2 hours boil
30m to roast
20m to rest

Level

Harder/fiddly glaze

Prep

If you have time, the night before you want to cook your gammon, put it in a bowl and cover with water; cover and leave overnight; drain the water off in the morning
OR – half an hour (or so) before you want to begin cooking the gammon, place it in the saucepan, cover with water and bring to the boil
Boil for 10 minutes
Pour the water off and clean the pan
Chop the vegetables into big pieces; the leek tops can go in as they are, the carrots in 4 or 6 pieces

Method

Place the soaked gammon into your saucepan and cover with fresh water
Add vegetables, peppercorns and bay leaf
Place the lid on the pan and bring to the boil
Scum will rise to the top; skim off using your spoon and chuck
When the water is boiling, turn the heat down so that the water is just boiling (simmering) but not too fast
Place the lid on, with a little space for steam to escape
Put a timer on so that you remember to check the gammon every 20-30 min, topping up the water if it starts to get a little low
Make sure it’s always boiling as the meat must cook the whole way through
20 minutes before the boiling time is up, turn your oven to 220C/200C fan
Take the jam and put into small bowl. Break it up with a fork so that it will spread
Get your carving tray/chopping board, and the large bowl you used for soaking
Using big forks or something similar, place the meat onto the carving tray
While it cools strain the stock through the colander into the bowl. Set aside **
Take your scissors and cut the string, and throw that away
Using your large knife, cut most of the rind off the meat, leaving about 5mm of fat
Discard the rind
Starting at the bottom of the gammon, use your sharp knife to cut 45 degree lines around 2cm apart, until you get to the top
Next, cut up the opposite way, so that you have diamonds!
Take your pastry brush and brush the jam all over the fat
Pick up and pop into the roasting tin, and then into the oven
Bake for about 20m, or until the ham is glazed and bubbling all over
Take out and put onto the tray to rest
Enjoy!

Leftovers?

Pop in a covered dish and place in the fridge when room temperature

** Stock

• When room temperature, pour into a container. This will keep in the fridge for about 3 days or the freezer for a couple of months. Puree with peas for a pea and ham soup

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

Leftover beef stew pies

Leftover beef stew pies

Pastry is delicious and pastry is heaven and pastry makes a little go a long way.  Each little pie is plenty full with only a tablespoon of filling.  Have lunchboxes to fill for work and school?  These could be a nice alternative to sandwiches.

As you’re re-heating the meat, these pies will keep nicely in the fridge for a couple of days, but freeze them if you’re not sure when you’re going to be eating them.  Serve with salad or plenty of veg.

Stew pies

Makes 6 little pies

Ingredients

300g leftover stew
225g shortcrust pastry*
Egg
A little flour to roll out pastry/dust the tray

* If making your own pastry: 175g plain flour
80g unsalted butter
pinch of salt
4 teaspoons of water – don’t add it yet!

Prep

Tools

Scales
Sharp knife
Whisk/fork
Baking tray
Kitchen paper

Time

If making pastry:1.5 hours (not all
If not, 50m

Level

So variable!  Harder to advanced

Prep

f using frozen pastry, defrost!
If making your pastry, rub together the butter and flour until sandy. When combined, add a teaspoon of water and see if you can turn it into a ball. Keep adding teaspoon by teaspoon until the pastry comes together
Put in a tupperware/bowl, cover, ad leave in the fridge for half an hour
When you’re ready to bake, take the pastry out of the fridge

Method

Turn oven to 200C
Lighly dust your baking tray with flour
Take the pastry and roll it out until around 3mm thick
Trim the edges off and place to the side
Cut the pastry into 6 rectangles
Taking one rectangle, place a tablespoon full/50-75g of stew on one half of the rectangle
Pull the other half of the rectangle over and squeeze together with your fingertips
Repeat until you’ve got 6 pastries
You might have to re-roll the pastry once to get enough rectangles
Taking your fork, squish the edges together
Place on the baking tray
Brush some beaten egg onto each pastry
Place in the oven and bake for 20m
Serve hot, or, if storing place on a wire rack until room temperature.
Store in a lidded container for up to 3 days in the fridge, or a couple of months in the freezer.

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

Leftover jacket potato gnocchi

Leftover jacket potato gnocchi

I’d always been intimidated to try gnocchi, and, as you can see, mine aren’t exactly pretty.  But they taste great.

 

This recipe calls for jacket potatoes as it helps to have slightly drier spuds.  If you want to make a half quantity, just use half an egg, and keep the rest in a little covered pot and save for adding to more eggs for a plate of scrambled eggs another day.

 

Note: we didn’t like it with tomato sauce; it felt too strong. Some pesto or, as I had the second time around, butter and sage, was nicer.

 

Gnocchi, considerably fuglier than Smitten Kitchen’s but still delic​​ious.

 

The flavour of cold old potatoes used to put me off, but no more.  Cooking them through, and with other strong flavours such as cheese or citrus, makes all the difference.  Sure, we can just add them diced and fried to a hash or a bubble, but I love to try something new and bring you some StorrCupboard magic to turn your leftovers into the main event.

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com