Blood orange & lemon jellies

Blood orange & lemon jellies

Home made gelatine jellies

Using up leftover gelatine wasn’t the easiest of challenges. I wasn’t about to start investigating the heritage of American jelly salads, though I’m sure they’re dear to people’s hearts. Our gelatine recipe choices are sweet, fun – and there’s no avoiding some sugar. Tamar Adlar does have set jelly salads in her latest book, though they’re more sun ripened tomatoes in aspic than tuna in pineapple jelly.  I’ll try them in the summer when it’s not stormy and not horizontal rain and bedsocks in the day.

Making these home-made jelly sweets was easy and fun. I tried using a shop-bought juice but the flavour, to me, was too dull and flat. I wanted something sharper and with the 10930825 lemons I had leftover from a Hubbub pancake day workshop, the decision was easy. Any leftover, sharp fruit or fruit juice would be excellent but I’d default to freshly squeezed or pulped if poss.

These jellies aren’t as set as a haribo but that’s what I like. They’re oddly satisfying. One or two after lunch and my sweet tooth is satisfied.  Are they good for gut health? A lot of wellness bloggers are talking about gelatine and gut health. I dunno, and I eat for joy and fun not wellness bullshit. These little guys used my citrus, they used my lovely Reduction Raider gelatine and they are tasty.

Note: don’t try to make these like fruit pastilles and roll in sugar; the sugar causes the set to melt and isn’t pretty. Like a sticky blood bath TBH.

So a little grown up sweetie, a hot cuppa and we have a zero waste, low-ish sugar, sweet. Which is hot pink. HOT PINK. You’re welcome.

 

 

 

 

Citrus jellies

Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time25 mins
Total Time35 mins

Ingredients

  • 1 pint freshly squeezed citrus/grapefruit (you need something with bite - orange juice won't cut it)
  • 8 leaves leaf gelatine
  • 90 grams caster sugar

Tools

  • Measuring jug
  • Bowl
  • Scissors
  • Saucepan
  • Whisk
  • Cake tin or plastic pot

Instructions

  • Cut the gelatine strips into pieces. Place them in the bowl and cover with cold water for 5 minutes
  • Whilst the gelatine softens, warm the juice and sugar in the saucepan. 
  • Use the whisk to make sure that the sugar is dissolved. Taste the juice. If it's super sharp you might want to add a little more.
  • After 5 minutes, squish the water out of the gelatine. Place it into the warm juice and whisk, baby.
  • When the gelatine has fully disolved, pour the mixture into the tub/tin. Leave to cool to room temperature then refrigerate.
  • When set, cut into little pieces and enjoy!

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

Fruity jelly

Fruity jelly

Leftover gelatine jelly

A few weeks back, the most wonderful Laura Reduction Rader messaged me and asked if I’d like to take ownership of a packet of leaf gelatine from a recent Olio stash that she had.  As a vegan, that was one leftover Laura couldn’t shift and lucky me, I got it! Hoo-bloody-ra!

A packet of way outta date gelatine arrived and, like anyone a little stumped, I put it on my desk and had a think. And a think.

I didn’t research about whether or not the gelatine was safe. A product so highly processed and stable (i.e. it’s not ‘live’ like yoghurt, more like a spice or pasta) and still sealed in its original packaging … honestly I’ve probably eaten ancient gelatine many times. I’m in full health and have a lifetime of eating questionable s=food stuffs. If pregnant, or poorly or elderly or feeding little ones, use your own judgement.

When my kids were little I’d sometimes make them jelly from scratch because I was always trying to make sure they ate more fruit & veg (and, honestly, trying to avoid sugar. Now the eldest eats it from a packet with a spoon…). Homemade jelly, often with some segments of orange stirred through, would be made once, and then not again for yonks. It just felt an effort, and juice isn’t that cheap.

But sometimes we buy a pack of gelatine, or feta, or peppers, for *one* thing and then the rest is just a proper pain in the arse. So this week we’re all about gelatine (yes, if you’d asked me 20, 15 or even 10 years ago, I wouldn’t have thought my life would rely so much on leftovers).

If you’ve ever experimented with jelly, and like some fruit juice, get creative and make layers and have fun. Or be like me. Just make it and add hundreds and thousands and eat it at 11am when you should be working but the jelly is calling…

 

 

Fruit Jelly

Use up your leftover gelatine to make this healthy-ish, fruity jelly
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time4 hrs
Total Time4 hrs 15 mins

Ingredients

  • for every 1 leaf gelatine
  • you need 140ml fruit juice

Tools

  • Measuring jug
  • Saucepan
  • Plate/shallow bowl
  • Bowls for jelly!

Ratio

  • If you have 2 leaves of gelatine, you'll need around 280 ml juice, 3 leaves 420 ml and so on

Instructions

  • Take the gelatine leaves, snip them up
  • Place them on a plate/shallow bowl and cover with cold water. Leave for 5 minutes
  • In a saucepan, gently heat the juice. Don't let it boil as boiled fruit tastes nasty
  • After 5 minutes squeeze the water from the gelatine. Place the gelatine leaves into the hot juice
  • Using a whisk or spoon, stir the gelatine in until fully melted
  • Pour into the serving bowl and leave to cool to room temperature
  • When room temperature, place in the fridge & leave to set

Storage

  • Will keep for up to a week or so but best eaten within a couple of days

Leftover busting chocolate ripple no-churn ice-cream

Leftover busting chocolate ripple no-churn ice-cream

Okay, once I learnt about no-churn ice-cream, well, it’s obvious I’m a convert.  There’s so little effort and it’s a perfect way to use up leftover cream and other little nice bits that hang around after Easter and Christmas.

Chocolate orange is one of my favourite flavour combos so get that Easter double cream whipped up with some condensed milk, sprinkle in the chopped up choc and you’ve got pudding sorted for another day. Or just you know eat it tonight.  With extra choc sauce.

Orange choc-chip no-church ice-cream

Inspired by Nigella
Makes 1.5 pints/800ml

Ingredients

300ml double cream
300ml condensed milk (a 397g tin)
1/2 tsp orange essense
Around 150g chocolate

Tools

Measuring jug
Large bowl
Electric whisk/stand mixer OR Balloon whisk and strong arms
Freezer proof container with lid

Time

10m prep 6 hours (at least) to freeze

Method

Chop the chocolate into little pieces with a large knife or food processor
Place the cream, milk and orange essence in the large bowl
Whisk together until there’s lot of little bubbles and the mixture is light and airy
Stir the chocolate through the ice cream
Pour into container
Leave to freeze

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

Leftover busting chocolate sauce

Leftover busting chocolate sauce

The problem with a houseful of leftover Easter chocolate varied; a lot of it is crap.  Half of it you don’t like but you know that you shouldn’t waste chocolate.  The crop is precious, as is sugar and milk.

Looking for a simple solution?  Be like my bestie’s mum and get your random choc, chop it up, pour in a little milk and microwave/heat on the hob.

Your choc sauce will make a decadent hot chocolate or drizzle it over some no churn ice-cream.  Any crunch mini egg shells should melt away; if your sauce is too sweet then add in some cocoa powder and rest assured that you’re making the best of your Easter chocolate glut.

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

One sad jacket potato cake

One sad jacket potato cake

Aren’t jacket potatoes great?  My life, in all seriousness and smallness, was changed when my ex’s mum stared at my gormless face as she pulled teeny, tiny jacket potatoes out of the oven.  “It’s a way of cooking, not a size” she tutted.  What a revelation: now jacket potatoes could be part of my meal, not the backbone to carry beans and cheese/cheese and sweetcorn/tuna mayo.  Though I love these, maybe a little too much – but now I could have jacket potatoes more often.

 

With lucky timing for comfort food padding as we all contend with the Beast from the East, let’s get using up our jacket potatoes that might be sitting around, needing some love.  There’s got to be more ideas that a bubble or a hash, love them as I do… well, time for some StorrCupboard magic.

 

(Note: this Rachel Roddy pizza is a brilliant vessel for a solitary spud.  It does, I think, need a fresh pizza base, so I didn’t post it as an option that everyone would try.  And I pointed you guys to a pizza last week. So consider this a double carb bonus  … Also: the mixed root veg cakes from a few weeks back are traditionally plain potato cakes, and would work well, too).

So, I know that this isn’t super quick but we are talking potatoes here. So, this is relative…

Bahahaaaa I haven’t told my kids there’s mash potato in their cake!  Think carrot cake: that’s not weird is it?  And a drizzle cake is *supposed* to be dense, zingy and this one certainly is.

 

This recipe calls for mash, but that’s not essential – just mash up your leftover jackets.  I didn’t have quite enough potato, so added some extra flour, and it just fine (I don’t need cake to be gluten free, but some GF flour would be fine, too).

 

I had one blood orange, one lemon and two limes in the fridge, so that’s why my cake is a pretty pink colour.  And tastes great.

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

Leftover yoghurt ice-cream

Leftover yoghurt ice-cream

Okay this is a new obsession.  I wouldn’t have gone near condensed milk a couple of years ago – high sugar and all that.  But I did buy ice-cream so … yeah, I know it doesn’t make sense.  Hell, who of us is all logic?
This isn’t a frozen yoghurt because of, you know, the cream. Most frozen yoghurts are made with thick greek yoghurt, which is higher in fat than regular yoghurt, so that’s why I added the cream.
This so simple recipe will banish that no-good peach yoghurt from the back of the fridge transform it into a pudding that everyone wants.  Plus it’s a good big almost-litre of ice-cream for about £2.50, and tastes as good/better as any Haagen-Dasz or Ben & Jerry’s, and a damn sight cheaper.

 

No-churn frozen yoghurt

Based on Simply Nigella No-churn Coffee ice-cream
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time4 hrs
Total Time4 hrs 10 mins
Course: Dessert
Author: Ann Storr

Ingredients

  • 1 tub (300ml) any yoghurt
  • 250 ml double cream
  • 175 ml condensed milk

Tools

  • Measuring jug
  • Large bowl
  • Electric whisk/stand mixer OR hand whisk and strong arms
  • Freezer proof container with lid

Instructions

  • Place the ingredients (aside from Treat) in the large bowl
  • Whisk together until there’s lot of little bubbles and the mixture is light and airy
  • Pour into container
  • If using, drizzle some sauce around the ice-cream and use a skewer/sharp knife to ripple it around
  • Place lid on and put in freezer
  • Seriously, that’s it

 

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com