Squashed strawberry sauce

Squashed Strawberry Sauce

Summer! Sun! Picnics!
Straaawwwwwberrieeeeeeeessssss.
Now I *know* we can get them all year round but goddam it I am not a lover of those chilly white topped berries, so I’m stoked it’s strawberry season.  The other weekend I spent £3 (!) on one punnet. Before I could eat them there were chores to be done, a train ride to enjoy and a one mile walk to meet a friend for a picnic.  By the time we sat down they were all mashed up, a little brown and … argh!
Though my friend laughed at me a little, I bagged up the strawberries up and brought them home. £3 guys! You know I hate to waste cash.  Strawberries are the devil to farm and expensive to harvest: by the time your punnet of berries gets to the shop there’s anything from 3% – 17% of a farmer’s crop wasted before it hits the supermarket or my poorly packed picnic bag.
So let’s bruise up this bashed up, almost wasted, hard earned food and make something delicious…
Strawberry sauce for your vanilla ice-cream – heaven. Take your bruised berries, whizz them with a blender and sieve. Just a little icing sugar (or honey if you prefer, though the texture will be different) and you have a light, delicious sauce. You could make this with any summer and autumn berries, just keen the ratio of fruit to sugar similar (strawberries are very acidic so you would use less sugar with raspberries or blackberries and loads less with blueberries).

 

Squashed Strawberry Sauce

Makes enough for 4 to enjoy, heartily, on ice-cream

Ingredients

  • 600 g strawberries the more bruised the better
  • 200 g icing sugar

Tools

  • Scales
  • Immersion blender
  • Fine mesh sieve
  • Mixing bowl
  • Sieve for icing sugar
  • Balloon whisk

Instructions

  • Remove the green tops (hulls) from the strawberries
  • If there are moudly bits, cut those off
  • Leave bruised fruit, that’s okay
  • Blend until smooth
  • Pour through the fine-mesh sieve into a bowl
  • Sift in icing sugar (don’t be tempted to skip this; you’ll spend longer whisking the lumps of icing sugar out...)
  • Whisk until the sugar is fully mixed
  • Pour into a jug

Storage

  • Your strawberry sauce will keep, covered, in the fridge, for a few days: they *were* manky berries, but the sugar is now going to preserve them.
  • Not sure it’s safe? Dip your finger in and taste it! If it tastes okay it is okay. If it feels a little fizzy on your tongue then congrats, you’re making your own alcohol. Chuck it!

Leftover busting chocolate ripple no-churn ice-cream

Leftover busting chocolate ripple no-churn ice-cream

Okay, once I learnt about no-churn ice-cream, well, it’s obvious I’m a convert.  There’s so little effort and it’s a perfect way to use up leftover cream and other little nice bits that hang around after Easter and Christmas.

Chocolate orange is one of my favourite flavour combos so get that Easter double cream whipped up with some condensed milk, sprinkle in the chopped up choc and you’ve got pudding sorted for another day. Or just you know eat it tonight.  With extra choc sauce.

Orange choc-chip no-church ice-cream

Inspired by Nigella
Makes 1.5 pints/800ml

Ingredients

300ml double cream
300ml condensed milk (a 397g tin)
1/2 tsp orange essense
Around 150g chocolate

Tools

Measuring jug
Large bowl
Electric whisk/stand mixer OR Balloon whisk and strong arms
Freezer proof container with lid

Time

10m prep 6 hours (at least) to freeze

Method

Chop the chocolate into little pieces with a large knife or food processor
Place the cream, milk and orange essence in the large bowl
Whisk together until there’s lot of little bubbles and the mixture is light and airy
Stir the chocolate through the ice cream
Pour into container
Leave to freeze

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

Leftover busting chocolate sauce

Leftover busting chocolate sauce

The problem with a houseful of leftover Easter chocolate varied; a lot of it is crap.  Half of it you don’t like but you know that you shouldn’t waste chocolate.  The crop is precious, as is sugar and milk.

Looking for a simple solution?  Be like my bestie’s mum and get your random choc, chop it up, pour in a little milk and microwave/heat on the hob.

Your choc sauce will make a decadent hot chocolate or drizzle it over some no churn ice-cream.  Any crunch mini egg shells should melt away; if your sauce is too sweet then add in some cocoa powder and rest assured that you’re making the best of your Easter chocolate glut.

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

One sad jacket potato cake

One sad jacket potato cake

Aren’t jacket potatoes great?  My life, in all seriousness and smallness, was changed when my ex’s mum stared at my gormless face as she pulled teeny, tiny jacket potatoes out of the oven.  “It’s a way of cooking, not a size” she tutted.  What a revelation: now jacket potatoes could be part of my meal, not the backbone to carry beans and cheese/cheese and sweetcorn/tuna mayo.  Though I love these, maybe a little too much – but now I could have jacket potatoes more often.

 

With lucky timing for comfort food padding as we all contend with the Beast from the East, let’s get using up our jacket potatoes that might be sitting around, needing some love.  There’s got to be more ideas that a bubble or a hash, love them as I do… well, time for some StorrCupboard magic.

 

(Note: this Rachel Roddy pizza is a brilliant vessel for a solitary spud.  It does, I think, need a fresh pizza base, so I didn’t post it as an option that everyone would try.  And I pointed you guys to a pizza last week. So consider this a double carb bonus  … Also: the mixed root veg cakes from a few weeks back are traditionally plain potato cakes, and would work well, too).

So, I know that this isn’t super quick but we are talking potatoes here. So, this is relative…

Bahahaaaa I haven’t told my kids there’s mash potato in their cake!  Think carrot cake: that’s not weird is it?  And a drizzle cake is *supposed* to be dense, zingy and this one certainly is.

 

This recipe calls for mash, but that’s not essential – just mash up your leftover jackets.  I didn’t have quite enough potato, so added some extra flour, and it just fine (I don’t need cake to be gluten free, but some GF flour would be fine, too).

 

I had one blood orange, one lemon and two limes in the fridge, so that’s why my cake is a pretty pink colour.  And tastes great.

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

Leftover yoghurt ice-cream

Leftover yoghurt ice-cream

Okay this is a new obsession.  I wouldn’t have gone near condensed milk a couple of years ago – high sugar and all that.  But I did buy ice-cream so … yeah, I know it doesn’t make sense.  Hell, who of us is all logic?
This isn’t a frozen yoghurt because of, you know, the cream. Most frozen yoghurts are made with thick greek yoghurt, which is higher in fat than regular yoghurt, so that’s why I added the cream.
This so simple recipe will banish that no-good peach yoghurt from the back of the fridge transform it into a pudding that everyone wants.  Plus it’s a good big almost-litre of ice-cream for about £2.50, and tastes as good/better as any Haagen-Dasz or Ben & Jerry’s, and a damn sight cheaper.

 

No-churn frozen yoghurt

Based on Simply Nigella No-churn Coffee ice-cream
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time4 hrs
Total Time4 hrs 10 mins
Course: Dessert
Author: Ann Storr

Ingredients

  • 1 tub (300ml) any yoghurt
  • 250 ml double cream
  • 175 ml condensed milk

Tools

  • Measuring jug
  • Large bowl
  • Electric whisk/stand mixer OR hand whisk and strong arms
  • Freezer proof container with lid

Instructions

  • Place the ingredients (aside from Treat) in the large bowl
  • Whisk together until there’s lot of little bubbles and the mixture is light and airy
  • Pour into container
  • If using, drizzle some sauce around the ice-cream and use a skewer/sharp knife to ripple it around
  • Place lid on and put in freezer
  • Seriously, that’s it

 

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

(Brown) Banana and nut butter smoothie

(Brown) Banana and nut butter smoothie

Anyone who’s looked at my feeds knows I love a good banana bread.  Specifically Nigella’s from ‘How to be a Domestic Goddess’ – dense, sweet, keeps well, uses two bowls.  Yes, another recipe where the pages are crusted and have strings of banana dried on.  Yummy.

 

But there’s got to be more ways with a browning nana than a banana bread, and given how my youngest will sometimes eat 3 in a day (I know) to zero in a week … well, I’ve got some practice.

 

Waaaaa….​​

 

Banana peanut butter smoothie

 

Quick.  Cheap.  Currently believed to be healthy.  Delicious.  Frugal.  So basically yeah, love em.

 

You don’t have to add the yoghurt and oats, but we sometimes have these as breakfast, so the oats help to keep you going.  Or leave them out, I’m not checking am I?

 

Blend the bananas first; I used to add extra sugar but if you blend the bananas alone, first, then it’s unecessary – and that’s some ££ saved, hoorah.

 

Sweet, cheap and filling banana smoothie​​

Banana and nut butter smoothie

Serves 2 kids or 1 adult

Ingredients

1 large banana (about 190g with peel on)
40g nut butter
40g yoghurt (cow or vegan)
20g small oats
150ml milk/milk alternative

Tools

Knife
Spoons
Stick blender/smoothie maker

Time

10 minutes max

Level

Easy

Prep

Remove bananas from freezer if necessary

Method

Blend banana on its own

Add nut butter and blend

Next oats (if using) and yoghurt.  Make sure it’s really smooth

Add milk until it’s the right texture for you (I like mine thin, but with the odd bonus lump of peanut butter…)

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

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