Chicken & chorizo stew

Chicken & chorizo stew

Roast chicken: so maybe a Thai-style curry isn’t your thing … little too fragrant? Or maybe you don’t have enough leftover chicken to create a meal by itself?
Padding out a small amount of chicken with chorizo way is a really cost-effective way to use of your leftovers. The lovely, strong paprika and pork flavours of the chorizo are a wonderful combination with the more simple flavour of the chicken.  If you have some people who are less keen on leftover chicken (like my youngest, who is not keen), then the chorizo does a great job by being a more dominant flavour.
If you’ve got little bits of chicken that your family aren’t mad keen on this recipe is for you.  200g of chicken isn’t much, okay – most people will eat around that on their roast dinner plate.  But we don’t need meat to always be the centre star of our meal, if can be there in the background.  Leftovers can sometimes be that inspiration you need for the next meal, which helps to add a little variety.
A chorizo, couple of peppers, an onion and a tin of beans will set you back around £5 – so that’s £5 for dinner for 4!  And you haven’t wasted any cash on binning the chicken.  RESULT!

Chicken, white bean & chorizo stew

Serves around 4
Serves 4: adapted from ‘Love Your Leftovers’, Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, p73

Ingredients

1 teaspoon sunflower/groundnut oil
1 cooking chorizo sausage (around 270g)
any bits of roast chicken skin, cut into thin strips
1 onion (around 115g)
2 red, yellow or orange peppers
2 garlic cloves
1 teaspoon ground cumin
300ml chicken stock/1 chicken stock cube
150-200g cooked chicken, shredded
400g tin cannellini beans
Pinch of dried chilli flakes (optional)
Salt & pepper

Tools
Scales
Chopping board
Knife
Teaspoon
Frying pan
Slotted spoon/flipper
Plate
Measuring Jug
Colander

Optional tools
Garlic crusher
Measuring spoons

Time
20 minutes prep
45 minutes cook

Level
Medium

Prep

Shred the chicken meat into pieces no wider than 5mm
Chop the chorizo into pieces around 1cm
Halve the onion, then finely slice it
Take a pepper; cut off one of its ‘cheeks’, then the rest (less waste this way)
Slice each piece of pepper into thin strips (around 3mm)
Squash/press the garlic cloves
If using a stock cube,make 300ml as per packet instructions (I often use half the amount of cube to water, as they are very salty)
Drain the beans

Method

Heat oil in your large frying pan over a medium heat
Add the chorizo and, if you have it, the chicken skin; cook gently until the chorizo releases its fat (around 5 minutes)
Remove the chorizo with the slotted spoon/flipper and place on the plate
Leave the skin to crisp up – another 3-5 minutes. When crisp, add to the chorizo
Add the onions and peppers to the pan and stir them around the chicken-y, chorizo-y fat
Let them cook for about 10-15 minutes, until soft
Only when soft, add the garlic and cumin. Stir. Be VERY careful to not let the garlic burn! This will take about 30 seconds-1 minute, so don’t walk off!
Return the chorizo to the pan and stir
Add the cooked chicken, drained beans, chilli (if using) and chicken stock
Bring to the boil and allow to simmer for 5 minutes,to ensure everything is cooked through

Storage/further meals

If you have any leftover, cover and leave to cool to room temperature
Store, covered, in the fridge for no more than a couple of days
You can eat at room temperature but I would not recommend re-heating the chicken again

 

 

 

 

 

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

Chicken & mango curry

I’m sorry, this is a slightly strange question to ask you, but – do you massage your limes?
Ahem.  (Blushing emoji).  Massaging your citrus fruit before squeezing is how to get every last drop of juice.  Limes, in particular, are rather rigid, and you can end up leaving them half unjuiced.  Roll that little fruit on the counter, back and forth, for about a minute and then – and onoy then – juice.  You’ll be amazed (well, I was when I first learnt this).
Using leftover meat for curry is a traditional technique; this fresh, Thai-inspired dish is amazing. It’s barely adapted from Rosie Ramsden’sRecipe Wheel‘ book. In this book she shows simple techniques and recipes for making food go a little further, and it’s fab. It’s a book that I always pick up (along with ‘Flavour Thesauras‘)
There’s a bit of chopping with this dish, but if you’re handy with a knife it shouldn’t take you the 30m that I list in the recipe.
The other tip in this recipe is to peel fresh ginger with a teaspoo. It’s so much less wasteful than using a grater; the thin, papery skin just rubs away, and means that you’re not lobbing off the knobbely bits.  Especially as most of the UK’s ginger is grown overseas, throwing so much of it away is not okay.
The mixture of soft chicken and mango with the richness of the coconut milk is divine.  This wasn’t a flavour pairing that I would ever have thought of, but the fresh mango is heavenly.   If you want to pad this out even further then some steamed green beans or even just peas would be lovely.

Chicken & mango curry

Serves 2; barely adapted from ‘The Recipe Wheel’, Rosie Ramsden, pp100-101

Ingredients

4cm knob of fresh root ginger
1 stick lemongrass
2 cloves garlic
1/2-1 whole red chilli
1 tablespoon groundnut oil
200g leftover chicken
160ml coconut milk
1 teaspoon fish sauce
1 ripe mango
Large bunch fresh coriander
1 lime
3 spring onions
2 tablespoons raw cashew nuts

Tools
Scales
Chopping board
Knife
Baking tray
Greaseproof paper
Grater
Sharp knife
Teaspoon
Large Pan
Peeler
Few bowls
Citrus squeezer/fork

Time
30 minutes prep
20m cook

Level
Easy

Prep

Turn oven to 180C and line your baking tray with greasproof paper
Pop the nuts in for 5 minutes. After 5, give them a shake and give them another 3-6 minutes – they’re done when they are golden brown. Place on one side and turn the oven off
Using a teaspoon, scrape the skin off the ginger
Grate the ginger
Finely chop the garlic and lemongrass
If you have a food processor place ginger, lemongrass and garlic in and pulverise! Otherwise finely finely chop
Finely chop the chilli
Peel the thick skin off the mango and cut thick slices off, then into chunky dice (squares)
Shred the chicken meat into pieces no more than 1cm thick
Pick the leaves off the coriander and roughly chop
Finely slice the spring onion
Take the cooled nuts and roughly chop
Roll your lime on your kitchen counter with the heel of your hand. Roll it around for at least 1 minute – this will make it much easier to squeeze
Squeeze the lime and put the juice to one side

Method

Heat groundnut oil in the frying pan over a medium-low heat and fry the lemongrass paste for 2 minutes, until fragrant
Add leftover chicken and stir so that everything is coated with the lemongrass mixture
Stir in the coconut milk and fish sauce and simmer for 10 minutes
Just before serving stir in the mango and coriander
Pour over the lime and stir through. Top with onions and nuts, and serve with rice

Storage/further meals

This doesn’t keep hugely well (all that fresh coriander) but you could store in the fridge, in a lidded contained, for a couple of days. Bring to room temperature and eat without reheating.

 

 

 

 

 

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

(Little bit brown) roast chicken and grapes

(Little bit brown) roast chicken and grapes

You smoothied your grapes and boozed up your grapes and you’ve still got more? Or maybe something a little more substantial is what you need.

Chicken and grapes might seem a little strange, but think about the jam-glazed ham: don’t we all love a little redcurrant jam or mint sauce with our roast lamb?  Some tomato ketchup with bacon? Apple sauce and roast pork?

Using slightly sad grapes is perfect here.  Roasting them a with a tray full of meat, veg and gravy means that any slight flavour imperfection will, quite frankly, be masked.  And sometimes, that’s what we need to do my leftover warriors.

The grapes take on the savoury flavour of the meat, and are jammy and pop in your mouth.  Honestly, I would never have tried this recipe if I wasn’t on a leftover busting mission.  But I’ve made it again and I love it.

Using grapes makes a fab gravy and mixing it all up means you’re saving cash and food waste: win win.

(Little bit brown) roast chicken and grapes
Barely adapted from Jamie Oliver
Serves 4 with leftovers

Ingredients

Sunflower/ground nut oil
1.5 kg chicken thighs
4 onions (600g)
4 carrots (600g)
2 cloves of garlic
Half a bunch of fresh rosemary, or 1/2 teaspoon of dried herbs
1 heaped tablespoon plain flour
300 ml white wine (optional) or water/more stock
200 ml veg/chicken stock
600 g potatoes
2 handfuls of leftover grapes
a few sprigs of fresh flat-leaf parsley (optional)
Salt and pepper

Tools

Scales
Sharp knife
Chopping Board
Measuring jug
Large frying pan
Roasting tin
Wooden spoons
Peeler, if peeing the carrots and potatoes

Optional

Tongs, for moving the chicken pieces around
Garlic crusher/grater

Level

Moderate – a fair bit of chopping

Prep

Season the chicken
Cut the onions in half and half again
Chop the carrots into chunks around 6cm long and then split down the middle
Squash and finely chop/grate the garlic
Strip the grapes from their vines
If using fresh rosemary, chop it finely

Method

Preheat the oven to 190C
Heat a tablespoon of oil in a large saucepan over a medium heat. Season the chicken, add it to the pan in batches, and fry until golden all over. Set aside on a plate
Add the veg to the pan and gently sauté for about 15 minutes over a medium-low heat, or until soft and sticky but not coloured
Return the chicken to the pan. Pick, finely chop and add the rosemary, then stir in the flour. Turn up the heat to medium-high and leave to colour for a few minutes.
Pour in the wine/water/300ml stock and bring to the boil, then lower the heat and let it reduce by half
Roughly chop and add the potatoes, pour in the stock, and bring it back to the boil
Transfer everything to a roasting tin and cook in the oven for 30 minutes, or until the potatoes are tender and the chicken is falling off the bone
Place the grapes in a small roasting dish, drizzle with a little oil and cook these in the oven for the last 20 minutes, or until caramelised
Stir the grapes into the chicken, finely chop and scatter over the parsley leaves (if using), and serve

Storage

Leave to cool.  When room temperature, cover and place in the fridge for up to 4 days.
If you might not eat it within 4 days, label and place in the freezer for up to 3 months

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

Cornflake crumbed chicken

Cornflake crumbed chicken

Cornflakes are a tricky leftover, I think, for one reason- if you don’t want to eat them in the way that you ‘should’ (in a bowl, with milk), then, what?  You’ve bought this box, this product.  Now you don’t have enough for a bowl of cereal so – well, what to do?  You’re not a mad, cereal mixing freak, are you?  ARE YOU?

Have you seen the recipes for a cornflake breakfast bowl?  What about the white chocolate cornflake cookies?  Not got a sweet tooth?  Well how about some soft chicken all crunchy with a nice corn(flake) coating?

Okay okay I know this is a litle Blue Peter BUT it works! Bash up the cornflakes and add in some peri-peri. This is a great way of using up all those odd ends at the bottom of the cereal bag and saves you from having to buy/make breadcrumbs. The chicken is crunchy and tender. I love it.

Top tip!  Use your right hand for coating the chicken with the flour/cornflakes, and your left for the egg.  This means your hands don’t end up with thick layers of crumb coating!

If you’re making loads and want to freeze, place layers of greaseproof paper in between the chicken, to stop them freezing into a solid mass OR lay them on a lined baking tray, cover and freeze.  When frozen, pop into a tupperware/bag, write what they are and enjoy your own frozen convenience food!

Cornflake crusted chicken

Serves 3-4, depending on appetite!

Ingredients

2 chicken breast fillets
1 egg
50g plan white/gluten free flour
Salt and pepper
1 1/2 teaspoons peri-peri spice mix (optional)

Tools
Scales
Chopping board
Sharp knife
2 plates
3 bowls
Whisk/fork
Frying pan
Slotted spoon/flipper
Kitchen paper

Optional tools
Measuring spoons

Time
10 minutes prep
15-25 minutes to make
20 to cook

Level
Little more advanced

Prep
Place cornflakes in a bowl and crush into small pieces with your hands
Add peri-peri to the cornflakes.  This optional, but it adds a nice flavour
Whisk the egg.  Season the egg with a little salt and pepper
Season the flour with a little salt and pepper
If using chicken breasts (rather than pre-sliced mini fillets), cut your chicken breast into long strips.  You should cut around 8 strips per breast

Method
Place the bowls in a row with a clean plate on the end
Pick up one chicken strip.  Place it in the flour.  Using your right hand, make sure the piece of chicken is entirely covered in flour
Place the floured chicken piece into the egg.
Using your LEFT hand, cover it in egg.  Still using your left hand, place the chicken into the crushed cornflakes.
Back to your right hand!  Press the cornflakes into the chicken quite firmly. This makes sure you’ve got a good amount of coating (and flatter makes for quicker cooking)
Place the crunchy fillet onto the plate
When you’re feeling confident you can do about 3 at once
Once they are ready, place a big frying pan on the hob, at medium hot heat
(If you’re getting supper ready, pop any veg on now – you’re about 20 minutes away)
Add enough oil so that you have 1mm in the bottom of the pan
Chuck one cornflake into the oil.  When it sizzles and wriggles, the oil is hot enough. DON’T CROWD THE PAN!  Your chicken won’t get crisp, which is gross.
The chicken pieces should sizzle but could burn easily, so don’t wander off.
Jiggle them around as they cook to help the heat to spread nicely
Turn each piece at around 5 minutes.  The chicken is cooked when it’s firm.  Worried?  Cut into the fattest one that’s cooking and check!
Leave to drain on some cooking paper while you cook the rest
Serve with veg or in a wrap with salad.

Storage/further meals
These won’t be so nice re-cooked, but would be great cold in a sandwich
If you know you won’t eat them all, place in a freezer bag/tub and freeze for up to 3 months.

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

Leftover sausage and bacon chowder

Leftover sausage and bacon chowder

What angel first paired smokey food and milk?  Comfort food of the highest order.  Chowder, an American soup from the east coast, has hundreds of iterations (I once sat with a cookbook devoted to chowder.  Totally ignored the friend who I hadn’t seen for about a year and her new home and hamsters, but I learnt a lot about chowder.  Sorry Becky).
If you can, use whole milk because you want that creaminess.  This is not the place for skimmed milk. The potatoes should be floury ones like maris pipers or king edwars- you want the potato to crumble in, so that you get the starchiness.
If you have time to cut the fat off the bacon and let it melt a little in the pan, then you’ll get more bacon-y flavour in the soup.  Yum.  Seriously – are you still cutting fat off bacon and frying it in olive oil?  STOP!  Snip off that cold fat (what is oil if not fat?) and pop it in the cold pan on a low heat and leeeeave it for about 15 mins.  That fat will, slowly, melt (“render”), and you can cook the onions and other veg for the soup in this fat.  And now you don’t have to buy more oil! So,you haven’t chucked good bacon fat AND you’ve not used unecesarry olive or sunflower oil, leaving it for another meal – so, that’s basically 2 food waste pitfalls avoided.  Win win!
In this chowder  I used basic veg, but you can add in sweetcorn, peas, diced pepper.  And even my kids eat this for heaven’s sake, so it’s a straight up win for me.  Whatever random bits of cold chicken, chorizo, veg -as long as it tastes good with the soup, it goes in.  Happy days!

Sausage and bacon chowder

Serves 4 modestly or 2 hungry hungry people

Ingredients

4 large potatoes
1 rasher bacon
2 cold sausages
2 eggs
200g cheese
Salt & pepper

Tools

Scales
Chopping board
Knife
Saucepan with a lid
Measuring jug
Wooden spoon

Time

10m prep
40m cook

Level

Little trickier

Prep

Optional: cut the fat off the bacon and place into a cool saucepan. Once it sizzles a little add some extra oil
Chop your veg
Crumble the sausage into small pieces

Method

Once the fat is warm, add the onion and cook on a moderate (middle) heat for about 10m. You don’t want the onions to brown, you want them to go translucent and soft enough to be squashed by the back of your wooden spoon

When the onions are cooked, add your diced potato, carrot and celery. Season. Place the lid on

Turn the heat down a little so that the veggies ‘sweat’ and get a little soft. This takes around 10m

Now that the chopped veggies are ready, pour the milk over and bring to the boil

DO NOT LEAVE YOUR PAN! Milk can boil over v quickly!

As soon as it’s boiling turn the pan down so it’s simmering (that is, little bubbles are popping up but it’s not boiling hard)

Timer on for 15m; keep checking the the veggies are done by pulling a couple out and checking if they are soft. Depending on how large/small you’ve cut them, this could take anything between 15 & 25m**

Add the crumbled meat, boil it through and serve with lots of buttered bread.

** If you’re making the soup in advance, turn the heat off and leave to cool. Do not add the meat. Store separately. When you’re ready to eat, heat the soup; as it comes to boil add the meat and let the soup boil for a minute or so, to make sure that the meat is fully hot. Do not reheat.

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

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