How to cook garlic and herb mushrooms

How to cook garlic and herb mushrooms

How to: make your own garlic mushrooms

Mushrooms are one of the most popular foods chosen in the UK; with loads of trying trying to reduce the amount of meat we eat, they can provide that lovely umaminess.
Also cracking with a full English.
However, supermarket mushrooms are wrapped in clingfilm. This is bonkers. Mushrooms are fungi, so inside plastic, they sweat. This is why mushrooms go off.
If you are buying your mushrooms like this, please remove the clingfilm as soon as you get home. This will *immediately* help your mushrooms to last longer.

I learned how to make these years ago, and it’s a technique that has served me well. I cook a box or two of cheap mushrooms up like this, and I know I have the beginnings of a creamy mushroom pasta or pizza night. I can add them to scrambled eggs or even just have them on toast. They could go with a steak, or sit on a bowl of polenta.

 

Garlic and herb mushrooms

Want to make the most of that half pack of mushrooms?
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time20 mins
Author: Ann Storr

Equipment

  • Knife & chopping board
  • Frying pan
  • Storage pot

Ingredients

  • Mushrooms
  • Oil any vegetable oil will do. Don't waste Extra Virgin Olive Oil here.
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1 bunch each thyme and rosemary
  • sea salt
  • 50 ml wine

Instructions

  • DO NOT WASH THE MUSHROOMS. If you feel peculiar about this, wipe them with a clean tea towel.
  • Slice the mushrooms to around 5mm
  • Pour in around 2 tablespoons of oil for every 200grams of mushrooms and turn the heat to medium. If you have a lot of mushrooms to cook, don't crowd the pan (see above). Season well with salt & pepper.
  • Stir the mushrooms every minutes to encourage water to evaporate.
  • If you have to cook a few batches of mushrooms, keep cooking them this way until they are all ready. Once they are all cooked through, crush or finely slice the garlic.
  • Remove all the mushrooms from the pan. Add in a little oil, if necessary. Once the oil is warm, add the garlic and stir for one minute. Return the mushrooms to the pan, turn up the heat and add the wine, if using. Once the alcohol has burned off, add in the whole herbs. Mix, test for seasoning and adjust. Continue to cook for a couple of minutes.

Using your garlic mushooms.

  • If stored in a lidded container, these will keep for a number of days in your fridge.
  • You can use them on toast, in scrambled eggs and omelettes, in creamy pasta and soup, in a quiche or on pizza...

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Fishfinger rice bowl

Fishfinger rice bowl

Fishfinger rice bowl

Sometimes I think of a leftover recipe. I imagine different reactions:
younger me “Cold fish and RICE?  ARE YOU ON DRUGS? Where’s the white sauce?!”
My parents: “Gosh, it is interesting how you combine different things isn’t it?”
My brothers: “Oh, yeah, well done”.

They aren’t the leftover lovers though!  Two leftover fish fingers are too good to waste, and this, to me, was surprisingly good.

The leftover friend’s super star, a rice bowl is a fab way to use up those odds and sods from the bottom of your fridge.  Any leftover greens, some salad: whatever.  Bet you’d buy it in M&S  or Pret without thinking, so have a go and make your own!  Okay, M&S and Pret wouldn’t be using fishfingers, but you might have some white fish or some chicken mixed with your rice and salad, so why not a fishfinger?

Cuisines across the world batter or egg & bread fish, so mixing up a fishfinger with a little boiled rice isn’t as mad as it might sound.  I mean, okay, I wouldn’t pay to eat it in a restaurant or claim that it’s authentic cuisine (well, it’s authentic Ann Storr but that’s not always a good thing TBF). With some salad, some chilli  – well, to me it’s a damn sight tastier than a coffee shop equivalent.  And no single-use plastic packaging. With this second, more photogenic rock around the block I used Thai sticky rice, which I prefer in this dish, and it was easier to eat with chopsticks (because yes I’m sure this is super, super authehtic Thai (side eye emoji).

If you take lunch into work, store the fish separately so that the crumbs don’t go soggy (bawk).  A little teryaki sauce is all that this needs to give you a filling and tasty lunch.  Or, if you don’t have any in the fridge, some tamari or soy sauce.

Nice rice, some veg, some fish: quick lunch​​

 

Fishfinger Rice Bowl

Yes I sort of hate me too.

Ingredients
  

  • 60 grams rice I used Thai, but whatever you have/like
  • 2 leftover fishfingers
  • Salad that you like
  • Teriyaki

Instructions
 

  • Cook the rice per packet instructions. Leave to cool.
  • If you're planning on eating this later, make sure that the rice is 100% room temperature before packing the salad as otherwise it'll steam slightly. If in doubt, pack a few small containers and combine when you're ready to eat.

Leftover Celery Stuffing

Leftover Celery Stuffing

Leftover Celery Stuffing

Stuffing, like Christmas turkey, pop music and Bonfire Night, did not occur in my childhood. “Tasteless” my parents would say and I didn’t even understand what it was. What how when and why was something stuffed? It was only a Christmas day with my then-in-laws coming that I realised I needed to learn, because they needed bird, stuffing, bread sauce – all the things I didn’t grow up eating.

I mixed and mashed herbs and chestnuts and dried fruits, pushing the fruity mixture into the chicken. I got it. Like pasta, Yorkshire puddings and a million other delicious carbs, stuffing has been used to bulk out expensive meat and veg.

This recipe is barely adapted from a Jane Grigson. I dialled the butter down a little, and, when I make it again, I’ll add in double the parsley, if I have it. Any herbs like parsley, tarragon, fennel fronds will all go in fine here. Even carrot tops, when they come in season in a few weeks, will work. Wild garlic, in the spring would be immense. Other than that, a batch of this stuffing will clear out your freezer of breadcrumbs, so it’s a double win.

The original recipe made mounds of stuffing; I’ve got my leftovers in the freezer, ready for a lazy Sunday lunch. Got loads of celery? Make a double batch and freeze, extending your celery for another week or month, ready to feed lots of family or friends, on your zero waste, leftover loving celery stuffing.

Leftover Celery Stuffing

Ann Storr
Barely adapted from Jane Grigson 'Good Things'

Ingredients
  

  • 150 grams onion around a medium size but anything between 100 and 180 grams will be fine...)
  • 150 grams celery
  • 50 grams unsalted butter
  • 250 grams fresh breadcrumbs
  • grated zst & juice of half a lemon
  • 4 tablespoons parsley/tarragon/chervil/wild garlic
  • 1 egg
  • salt & pepper

Tools

  • Scales
  • Chopping board and knife
  • Saucepan with lid
  • Mixing bowl
  • Whisk/fork (for the egg)
  • Optional: tray for baking stuffing, if not stuffing a chicken/turkey extra sunflower/ground nut oil for cooking

Instructions
 

  • Melt the butter in the saucepan
  • Dice the onion and celery and add to the pan. Cook the onion and celery over a low heat for about 20 minutes until they are soft and translucent - do not let them brown.
  • Whilst the celery and onion are cooking, finely chop the herbs and whisk the egg. 
  • When the food is cooked, remove the pan from the heat. Mix all the ingredients together. Season to taste.
  • Either stuff in the bird or roll into satsuma sized balls and bake, basting with oil from the roasting bird or, for vegetarians, a vegetable oil

Herby corn bread

Herby corn bread

I love cornbread, corn chips, corn crackers, corn fed chicken and sweetcorn.  Big bowls of polenta (grits) all rich with corn, butter and cheese, topped with heaps of veg or ragu/bolognese.  It’s the warm flavour of corn that does it for me.  So I offer you: herby cornbread.
Cornbread pairs really well with chilli, ribs and barbecue.  It’s also amazing toasted, buttered, and topped with a fried egg. If you’re making lunchbox food, make 12 muffins that you can freeze, and pop out of the freezer straight into a lunchbox as needed.  If you won’t eat the whole loaf in a day or so, get it frozen!  Slice it, freeze it, label it – and, hey!  Maybe breakfast could be cornbread and eggs rather than toast and marmite?  (Though I love toast and marmite tbf).
NOTE: do not use quick cook polenta; it’s milled the wrong way for this.  A bag of cornmeal/polenta will set you back 80p, and it’s amazing in cakes and bread.  If you bake homemade pizza, you can use it to dust the bottom of the tin, so it won’t go to waste.

Herby Cornbread

Adapted from Smitten Kitchen
Prep Time 15 mins
Cook Time 30 mins
Course Side Dish
Cuisine American

Equipment

  • Scales
  • 2 mixing bowls
  • Teaspoons
  • Balloon whisk
  • Measuring jug
  • Chopping board
  • Sharp knife
  • Greaseproof paper
  • Scissors
  • Large loaf tin/7 inch round tin OR 12 pan muffin tin & liners
  • Skewer

Ingredients
  

  • 125 grams plain flour
  • 145 grams course cornmeal/polenta NOT QUICK COOK!
  • 10 grams granulated sugar
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • up to 50 grams mixed fresh herbs
  • 1/2 teaspoon table salt
  • 1 large egg lightly beaten
  • 225 ml sour cream *
  • 150 ml whole milk *
  • 2 tablespoons neutral oil ground nut, sunflower, light olive oil
  • * If you buy a 300ml tub of sour cream and you might not use it all just shove it in and use less milk; if you can only afford/want to get a 150ml tub, then add more. Sure, the consistency will be a little different, but variety is the spice of life, no?

Instructions
 

Prep

  • Preheat the oven to 180C
  • Line your loaf or cake tin with greaseproof paper
  • Finely chop/process your herbs

Method

  • Whisk flour, cornmeal, sugar, baking powder and salt together in a large bowl
  • In a smaller bowl, whisk together the egg, sour cream, milk and oil
  • Stir the wet ingredients into the dry ones using your balloon whisk, mixing until just barely combined
  • Spread the batter in your prepared tin or into the muffin tin and bake for 22 to 25 minutes for bread, around 15 for the muffing
  • A skewer pushed into the middle of the cake should come out clean

Storage

  • Cornbread doesn't keep well so freeze when cool.
Keyword corn bread, lunchboxes, muffins

(Bought too many herbs) cornbread

Based on Smitten Kitchen’s Sourcream cornbread with Aleppo

Makes 1

Ingredients

125 grams plain flour
145 grams course cornmeal/polenta (NOT QUICK COOK!)
10 grams granulated sugar
2 teaspoons baking powder
up to 50 grams mixed, fresh herbs
1/2 teaspoon table salt
1 large egg, lightly beaten
225 ml sour cream *
150ml whole milk *
2 tablespoons neutral oil (ground nut, sunflower, light olive oil)

* If you buy a 300ml tub of sour cream and you might not use it all, just shove it in and use less milk; if you can only afford/want to get a 150ml tub, then add more. Sure, the consistency will be a little different, but variety is the spice of life, no?

Tools

Scales
2 mixing bowls
Teaspoons
Balloon whisk
Measuring jug
Chopping board
Sharp knife
Greaseproof paper
Scissors
Large loaf tin/7 inch round tin
Skewer

Time

15-20 minutes to weigh and mix
22-25 minutes to bake
Around 10 minutes to cool before slicing

Prep

Preheat the oven to 180C
Line your loaf or cake tin with greaseproof paper
Finely chop/process your herbs

Method

Whisk flour, cornmeal, sugar, baking powder and salt together in a large bowl
In a smaller bowl, whisk together the egg, sour cream, milk and oil
Stir the wet ingredients into the dry ones using your balloon whisk, mixing until just barely combined
Spread the batter in your prepared and bake for 22 to 25 minutes
A skewer pushed into the middle of the cake should come out clean

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

Bought-too-many-herbs garlic bread

Bought-too-many-herbs garlic bread

“There’s no such thing as too much butter” said a friend to me one boozy evening.  I texted him a picture of the garlic bread I’d just made, after a couple of glasses of pinot.  “Okay”, he said “maybe you have a point”.
Dear leftover lovers I have refined for you my butter to bread ratios, and I bring you a herby garlic butter to make fabulous use of that handful of herbs.
Garlic bread, in its full 80s/90s glory, has to be made with a supermarket baguette, all bleached white.  You need to squash up your garlic for this recipe, so use a crusher or grate it on the ‘thin cheese’ side of your box grater.  You *don’t* want to bite into chunks of garlic (shudder).
Think your kiddos might balk at this amount of greenery in the garlic bread?  Add more butter and garlic so that the ratio is more to their liking.  If you have a food processor, you can cut the herbs teeny tiny, which might help.
Any herb-garlic butter you don’t use now can be wrapped and frozen for another time; you can stir it through pasta, use it in a jacket potato or to melt over a perfectly cooked steak.

(Bought too many herbs) garlic bread

Serves 4

Ingredients

15g herbs (parsley, coriander, chives) after removing stalks
7g garlic (roughly x2 cloves)
75g unsalted butter
Salt and pepper
Half a big baguette

Tools

Grater/crusher
Chopping board
Bread knife
Bowl

Time

15 minutes to mix
15 minutes to bake

Prep

Take the butter out of the fridge – if you can, n hour or so before using but even 10 minutes is helpful, but not essential
Turn the oven to 220C

Method

Take your herbs and
EITHER
Gather them into a little bundle and, using your knife, chop them.  As the bundle flattens and spreads, gather it up again and chop again.  And again!
OR – process quickly in a blender/immersion blender so finely chopped but not into a paste
Garlic: either grate it using the thin cheese side of your box grater, or use your garlic crusher, or squash to a paste with the side of your knife
Place the garlic, herbs, butter and salt into a mixing bowl
Get your hands right in there and squish that shit together so you’ve got a nice even mixture
When you’re happy with the mixture, wash your hands!
Take your bread knife and cut slices into the baguette around 2cm wide – like a garlic bread from the supermarket
Take a loaded teaspoon sized scoop of butter and squish it into each cut into the bread
Keep going until the garlic herb butter is evenly spread out
When all the butter has been used, place the bread on a tray and into the oven
Check after 10 minutes; you want the bread to be golden and crunchy, the butter all melted
You might need a little more time; if the top is golden but the butter not melted, just turn the heat off and leave the bread in – the leftover heat will do the job
Eat …. enjoy!

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

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