Double boozy brandy butter ice-cream

Double boozy brandy butter ice-cream

Brandy butter is a mainstay of Christmas cooking for a lot of us; I made two huge jars this year because one is never enough.  But two is too many; so here is my fourth way with your leftover brandy butter.  If you’re new from the Evening Standard, welcome!  I hope that you find loads of useful recipes for your Christmas leftovers.

Discovering no-churn ice-cream was huge for me; when leftover cream sits in the fridge it can be a bore and a pain. Plus the dairy industry uses a whole heap of emissions and

I now keep a tine of condensed milk in the kitchen; it’s cheap and means that I now never, ever waste cream.  If you don’t have any boozy cream then you must add a slug of brandy, whiskey or vanilla extract to your cream.  Plain cream makes for a flat ice-cream and, well, I have a whole portion to work through (I’m thinking a hot fudge sauce or an expresso poured over will get that one going).

If (if!) you have annoying leftover chocs, you can chop them up and add them in; I went for pounding some salty peanuts and sprinkling them on top.  Or do both!  A true, proper, leftover busting recipe.

Brandy butter double boozy no-churn ice-cream

Inspired by Nigella’s No Churn Coffee Ice -Cream
Makes 1.5 pints/800ml

Ingredients

250 ml cream – you can mix up boozy Xmas creams and plain cream
175ml condensed milk
If using plain cream, add a good tablespoon of whiskey/brandy/vanilla essence
To serve: pounded peanuts, finely chopped choc or chocolate sauce

Tools
Measuring jug
Large bowl
Electric whisk/stand mixer OR Balloon whisk and strong arms
Freezer proof container with lid

Time
10m prep
6 hours (at least) to freeze

Method

Place the creams and condensed milk in the large bowl
Whisk together until there’s lot of little bubbles and the mixture is light and airy
Crumble in the brandy butter and stir
Pour into container
Place lid on and put in freezer

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

Cake Crumb topping for ice cream

Cake Crumb topping for ice cream

It’s summer fete season, oh lord it is. Baking and buying cakes for school and community fairs and then … buying them back again. And chez StorrCupboard it’s birthday season, so there’s an awful lot of butter, eggs, flour, sugar and all sorts going everywhere.
You get your tupperware back or you bring your box of cake from the fair and there’s a mass of crumbs …. everywhere. Or as you clear away a birthday cake, how much goes in the kids and how much on the floor, plates, mashed everywhere?
Cakes are wonderful, delicious and flipping expensive to bake. Full of butter, eggs and sugar, cakes are food-energy high foods. The chicken that laid your egg needed feeding and that egg was transported all around the goddam country for before it got as far as your basket. The (likely) wheat in your cake may be UK but could also be from as far as the US or Canada. The sugar is probably not British sugar beet, and is likely to have come from countries in Africa.  Not to mention the feed that the cows ate to produce to the milk that was transported to make the butter –
Sorry what? You were going to chuck that cake? No, come on now, you weren’t, were you?
This leftover idea comes from the amazing Rosie Ramsden. I have simplified a simple recipe, but sometimes it doesn’t take much to go from bin fodder to something delicous and more-ish. Take your cake crumbs, icing and all (which will bake into the cake and help it to caramelise), pop them in a warm oven and ten minutes later you have a tasty, topping for a bowl of ice-cream. You can use any cake for this, so happy baking!

Crunchy cake crumbe for ice cream

Barely adapted from Rosie Ramsden, ‘The Recipe Wheel, p253

Ingredients

As many cake crumbs as you have!

Tools
Baking tray

Time
Time for your oven to preheat
5-10 minutes to bake

Level
Super easy

Method

Turn the oven to 180C
Line the baking tray with greaseproof paper
Crumble the cake onto the tray
Place the tray into the pre-heated oven
Toast for 5-10 minutes until crisp
Either leave to cool or sprinkle over whilst still warm and let it melt the ice-cream

 

 

 

 

 

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

Squashed strawberry & rhubarb crumble

Squashed strawberry & rhubarb crumble

Squashed strawberry and rhubarb crumble

Yeah I know, you don’t believe me do you?  And it might not be my first choice of crumble but hear me out.  Sometimes, in our food waste fight, sometimes we’re going to try things that aren’t our first choice.  We’re going to look again at the bashed up berries, brought home from the after-school picnic and not reason that, if it’s going in the food-waste bin or home compost, that it’s okay, that it doesn’t matter.  It matters!  You bought the berries: you stood in the supermarket.  You thought about how much they cost, or you decided not to buy the organic because they cost more.
Hot strawberries? *With* rhubarb? Come on! I know Felicity Cloak dismissed it the other week, but I disagree. It’s sweet, sour and jammy delicious.   I love crumble, and my mum made one every couple of weeks. Always the staples – apple or rhubarb. Any deviation meant my brothers and I bitching and whinging. When I had my own kids, I realised that crumble is the perfect hide-away for a bit of rhubarb and a couple of apples.
Served with double cream, or ice cream if you must, enjoy your zero-waste, squashed strawberry crumble.

Squashed Strawberry & Rhubarb Crumble

Adapted from Jane Baxter for Riverford

Ingredients
  

  • around 150 grams rhubarb
  • around 200 grams strawberries
  • 1 tablespoon flour
  • 125 grams plain/gluten free flour
  • 50 grams rye/spelt/gluten free oat flour
  • pinch salt
  • 100 grams unsalted butter
  • 75 grams sugar 50 grams for the crumble, 25 to sprinkle on the fruit

Tools

  • Scales and bowl
  • Knife and chopping board
  • Oven proof dish

Optional

  • Food processor

Instructions
 

  • Turn the oven to 180C

Make the crumble - processor method

  • Place the flour(s), salt, sugar and butter in the food processor. Process until they resemble fine sand.

Make the crumble by hand

  • With the crumble ingredients, rub the butter into the flour and sugar, rubbing in but not pressing down to clump the butter together. It will take around 5 minutes.

Prepare the fruit

  • Cut the rhubarb into 2cm long pieces. Cut any large strawberries in half and sprinkle the flour over turning the berries around. Sprinkle over the 25 of sugar.
  • Sprinkle the crumble over, taking care to not press it down too hard
  • Bake for around 30 minutes, or until the crumble is golden brown and the fruit is bubbling up the sides.

Storage

  • Crumble isn't as good reheated. If you're making this to use up old fruit but you won't eat it all, freeze the filing on its own, or the uncooked crumble in a freezer and oven-proof dish. You can cook through from frozen, it'll just take longer.

Squashed strawberry sauce

Squashed Strawberry Sauce

Summer! Sun! Picnics!
Straaawwwwwberrieeeeeeeessssss.
Now I *know* we can get them all year round but goddam it I am not a lover of those chilly white topped berries, so I’m stoked it’s strawberry season.  The other weekend I spent £3 (!) on one punnet. Before I could eat them there were chores to be done, a train ride to enjoy and a one mile walk to meet a friend for a picnic.  By the time we sat down they were all mashed up, a little brown and … argh!
Though my friend laughed at me a little, I bagged up the strawberries up and brought them home. £3 guys! You know I hate to waste cash.  Strawberries are the devil to farm and expensive to harvest: by the time your punnet of berries gets to the shop there’s anything from 3% – 17% of a farmer’s crop wasted before it hits the supermarket or my poorly packed picnic bag.
So let’s bruise up this bashed up, almost wasted, hard earned food and make something delicious…
Strawberry sauce for your vanilla ice-cream – heaven. Take your bruised berries, whizz them with a blender and sieve. Just a little icing sugar (or honey if you prefer, though the texture will be different) and you have a light, delicious sauce. You could make this with any summer and autumn berries, just keen the ratio of fruit to sugar similar (strawberries are very acidic so you would use less sugar with raspberries or blackberries and loads less with blueberries).

 

Squashed Strawberry Sauce

Makes enough for 4 to enjoy, heartily, on ice-cream

Ingredients
  

  • 600 g strawberries the more bruised the better
  • 200 g icing sugar

Tools

  • Scales
  • Immersion blender
  • Fine mesh sieve
  • Mixing bowl
  • Sieve for icing sugar
  • Balloon whisk

Instructions
 

  • Remove the green tops (hulls) from the strawberries
  • If there are moudly bits, cut those off
  • Leave bruised fruit, that’s okay
  • Blend until smooth
  • Pour through the fine-mesh sieve into a bowl
  • Sift in icing sugar (don’t be tempted to skip this; you’ll spend longer whisking the lumps of icing sugar out...)
  • Whisk until the sugar is fully mixed
  • Pour into a jug

Storage

  • Your strawberry sauce will keep, covered, in the fridge, for a few days: they *were* manky berries, but the sugar is now going to preserve them.
  • Not sure it’s safe? Dip your finger in and taste it! If it tastes okay it is okay. If it feels a little fizzy on your tongue then congrats, you’re making your own alcohol. Chuck it!

Leftover busting chocolate ripple no-churn ice-cream

Leftover busting chocolate ripple no-churn ice-cream

Okay, once I learnt about no-churn ice-cream, well, it’s obvious I’m a convert.  There’s so little effort and it’s a perfect way to use up leftover cream and other little nice bits that hang around after Easter and Christmas.

Chocolate orange is one of my favourite flavour combos so get that Easter double cream whipped up with some condensed milk, sprinkle in the chopped up choc and you’ve got pudding sorted for another day. Or just you know eat it tonight.  With extra choc sauce.

Orange choc-chip no-church ice-cream

Inspired by Nigella
Makes 1.5 pints/800ml

Ingredients

300ml double cream
300ml condensed milk (a 397g tin)
1/2 tsp orange essense
Around 150g chocolate

Tools

Measuring jug
Large bowl
Electric whisk/stand mixer OR Balloon whisk and strong arms
Freezer proof container with lid

Time

10m prep 6 hours (at least) to freeze

Method

Chop the chocolate into little pieces with a large knife or food processor
Place the cream, milk and orange essence in the large bowl
Whisk together until there’s lot of little bubbles and the mixture is light and airy
Stir the chocolate through the ice cream
Pour into container
Leave to freeze

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

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