Fishfinger rice bowl

Fishfinger rice bowl

Fishfinger rice bowl

Sometimes I think of a leftover recipe. I imagine different reactions:
younger me “Cold fish and RICE?  ARE YOU ON DRUGS? Where’s the white sauce?!”
My parents: “Gosh, it is interesting how you combine different things isn’t it?”
My brothers: “Oh, yeah, well done”.

They aren’t the leftover lovers though!  Two leftover fish fingers are too good to waste, and this, to me, was surprisingly good.

The leftover friend’s super star, a rice bowl is a fab way to use up those odds and sods from the bottom of your fridge.  Any leftover greens, some salad: whatever.  Bet you’d buy it in M&S  or Pret without thinking, so have a go and make your own!  Okay, M&S and Pret wouldn’t be using fishfingers, but you might have some white fish or some chicken mixed with your rice and salad, so why not a fishfinger?

Cuisines across the world batter or egg & bread fish, so mixing up a fishfinger with a little boiled rice isn’t as mad as it might sound.  I mean, okay, I wouldn’t pay to eat it in a restaurant or claim that it’s authentic cuisine (well, it’s authentic Ann Storr but that’s not always a good thing TBF). With some salad, some chilli  – well, to me it’s a damn sight tastier than a coffee shop equivalent.  And no single-use plastic packaging. With this second, more photogenic rock around the block I used Thai sticky rice, which I prefer in this dish, and it was easier to eat with chopsticks (because yes I’m sure this is super, super authehtic Thai (side eye emoji).

If you take lunch into work, store the fish separately so that the crumbs don’t go soggy (bawk).  A little teryaki sauce is all that this needs to give you a filling and tasty lunch.  Or, if you don’t have any in the fridge, some tamari or soy sauce.

Nice rice, some veg, some fish: quick lunch​​

 

Fishfinger Rice Bowl

Yes I sort of hate me too.

Ingredients
  

  • 60 grams rice I used Thai, but whatever you have/like
  • 2 leftover fishfingers
  • Salad that you like
  • Teriyaki

Instructions
 

  • Cook the rice per packet instructions. Leave to cool.
  • If you're planning on eating this later, make sure that the rice is 100% room temperature before packing the salad as otherwise it'll steam slightly. If in doubt, pack a few small containers and combine when you're ready to eat.

Bought-too-many-herbs garlic bread

Bought-too-many-herbs garlic bread

“There’s no such thing as too much butter” said a friend to me one boozy evening.  I texted him a picture of the garlic bread I’d just made, after a couple of glasses of pinot.  “Okay”, he said “maybe you have a point”.
Dear leftover lovers I have refined for you my butter to bread ratios, and I bring you a herby garlic butter to make fabulous use of that handful of herbs.
Garlic bread, in its full 80s/90s glory, has to be made with a supermarket baguette, all bleached white.  You need to squash up your garlic for this recipe, so use a crusher or grate it on the ‘thin cheese’ side of your box grater.  You *don’t* want to bite into chunks of garlic (shudder).
Think your kiddos might balk at this amount of greenery in the garlic bread?  Add more butter and garlic so that the ratio is more to their liking.  If you have a food processor, you can cut the herbs teeny tiny, which might help.
Any herb-garlic butter you don’t use now can be wrapped and frozen for another time; you can stir it through pasta, use it in a jacket potato or to melt over a perfectly cooked steak.

(Bought too many herbs) garlic bread

Serves 4

Ingredients

15g herbs (parsley, coriander, chives) after removing stalks
7g garlic (roughly x2 cloves)
75g unsalted butter
Salt and pepper
Half a big baguette

Tools

Grater/crusher
Chopping board
Bread knife
Bowl

Time

15 minutes to mix
15 minutes to bake

Prep

Take the butter out of the fridge – if you can, n hour or so before using but even 10 minutes is helpful, but not essential
Turn the oven to 220C

Method

Take your herbs and
EITHER
Gather them into a little bundle and, using your knife, chop them.  As the bundle flattens and spreads, gather it up again and chop again.  And again!
OR – process quickly in a blender/immersion blender so finely chopped but not into a paste
Garlic: either grate it using the thin cheese side of your box grater, or use your garlic crusher, or squash to a paste with the side of your knife
Place the garlic, herbs, butter and salt into a mixing bowl
Get your hands right in there and squish that shit together so you’ve got a nice even mixture
When you’re happy with the mixture, wash your hands!
Take your bread knife and cut slices into the baguette around 2cm wide – like a garlic bread from the supermarket
Take a loaded teaspoon sized scoop of butter and squish it into each cut into the bread
Keep going until the garlic herb butter is evenly spread out
When all the butter has been used, place the bread on a tray and into the oven
Check after 10 minutes; you want the bread to be golden and crunchy, the butter all melted
You might need a little more time; if the top is golden but the butter not melted, just turn the heat off and leave the bread in – the leftover heat will do the job
Eat …. enjoy!

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

Bought-too-many-herbs salad

Bought-too-many-herbs salad

Hello!  Hi!  StorrCupboard is back!  With the help of the amazing Elizabeth Barrett and others, StorrCupboard is now fully searchable and *much* easier to use.
Not all of the recipes are back online yet; this is my passion project and my love, but there are 2 kids that need tending and a career that needs growing. This isn’t perfect but it’s here to help you.  Please email me at ann @ storrcupboard.com with any questions and I’d love to help you.
So … herbs.  We buy them because a recipe says that we need just a handful, and that fresh tastes better (usually, the recipe is right).  But wasting fistfuls of delicate green leaves is plain nuts.
The simplest way to use up herbs is to finely chop them and store in ice-cube trays.  Easy.
But how about something that is going to be a cheap, filling and healthy lunch?  Take inspo from the amazing, the wonderous, Ottolenghi & Honey & Co.  Both Ottolenghi, and the Honies (as they are often called) were born and raised in the Middle East, where herbs are used a lot more in cooking.  Handfuls of herbs are used in salads along with lettuce, spinach and rocket which adds another layer of fresh flavour.  If you’re my age or more, you’ll remember *how* exciting it was when rocket! replaced! iceberg! lettuce!  (Unless you are my parents so a salad is iceberg lettuce, sliced cucumber and quartered tomatoes).
This simple salad was a couple of handfuls of bagged salad, loads of parsley and coriander, along with said tomatoes and cucumber.  It doesn’t have to be rocket science (sorry).  Enjoy the tweak of the added handful of herbs to your salad and make sure there’s never a leftover, leftover.

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

(One too many) Courgette Salad

(One too many) Courgette Salad

Supermarkets and packets.  Argh!  Yes they’re easy but over the next few weeks StorrCupboard will be thinking about those pre-packed bags of veg.  There’s often one courgette too many, and don’t get me started on those green peppers …
Courgette recipes have come a long way since my dear grannie used to boil hers until the veg and the water ran grey (food *my* grannie would recognise was cup-a-soup, stale Skips and overboiled everything).
So let’s think of the virtues of a courgette.  If it’s not too old, it should still have a nice texture, quite firm but not hard so it cooks really quickly; it has a mild flavour, so we can pair it with bolder flavours like olives, tomatoes, cheese, lamb.
Courgettes are, really, a late summer to autumn veg, because they need the warmth of the sun to bring them to ripeness.  Remember the price rise in courgettes back in February 2018?  That’s because your courgettes were likely imported from Spain and Italy outside of harvest (usually September – October in the UK, but god knows this year).  A drought was causing waste and pushing up the price of your little green goddess.  Chucking a veg that goes on a short-haul flight from drought ravaged fields just to get to you isn’t really on, so time for some StorrCupboard magic.
And it doesn’t get any easier than this: grate a not-too old courgette and add it to your salad.  Seriously.  Just use the wide side of your box grater and get busy.   Or if you have a speed peeler, make some long ribbons, like I did up here. The light mild flavour works beautifully – I had this cucumer, tomato and spinach mix with a little olive oil and salt.  And lots of hummus and bread.  Yum and waste averted.

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

Sad Satsuma Salad

Sad Satsuma Salad

Last weekend I stayed with a lovely friend, drinking prosecco, sitting on her fire escape, gossiping and eating Malteasers. Heaven.  (We half pretend we’re in ‘Sex and the City’.  Because we are grown ups and we can. Ahem).

On Sunday morning I pulled my ‘weary’ head from the sofa and headed for the kettle.  Sitting there, on the counter top, I saw a familiar sight in her fruit bowl: 6 sad satsumas.  Satsumas, tangerines, clementines, whatever How many of yours go off before you eat them?  For me it can be at least 3 if I’m not careful.  And once the mould sets in … well if even Mum Storr says they are beyond hope, well I believe her.

These citrus fruits will have been picked aaaaaages ago.  Then from tree to pallet to packing to distribution to shipping and redistribution *at least*.  Think of all that electricity and fuel that’s been used to get these fruits to you!  From Spain (maybe) but most likely South Africa and beyond.  And that is *far*.  When I have citrus fruits, I store them in the fridge and take out more only when the fruit bowl is empty.  This means a waste hardly any these days.

Thanks to Instagrammer Saz for asking me about satsuma ideas; I hope that these are even more ideas for your too-full fruitbowl.

This salad is a Ghanaian beauty from the *amazing* Zoe Adjonyoh.  Sweet chunks of mango, pineapple and cool cucumber are dressed with the juice from your sad satsumas for a delicious and refreshing side salad. It might seem a little unusual mixing fruit and veg in a bowl, but come on!  Redcurrant and lamb!  A slice of cheese with a slice of apple!  Ketchup and chips?

Mango & pineapple salad

Barely adapted from Zoe Adjonyoh, ‘Zoe’s Ghana Kitchen’, p58

Ingredients

50ml fresh satsuma juice (about 3-4)
2 tablespoons apple juice, or more satsuma if you’re feeling skint
Juice of 1 lemon
2 ripe mangoes
1/2 ripe pineapple or
200-300g tinned pineapple in juice
1/2 cucumber
200g rocket or baby spinach
Pinch salt
50g roasted and salted cashew nuts

Tools

Scales
Two large mixing bowls
Sharp knife, chopping board
Big knife for the nuts
Peeler
Bread knife
Juice squeezer/fork
Mixing bowl

Time

30 minutes

Prep

Mix the juices in a bowl
Take your peeler and peel the mango
Cut the flesh off the fruit and cut it into cubes
Take your pineapple
Pick up your breadknife and slice off the bottom and the top
With the pineapple ‘standing’ upright, take you breadknife and cut the spiky skin off the sides
When all the skin is off, you’ll probably find some little pieces of skin left (the eyes)
Use a small, sharp knife or pointy potato peeler to take the ‘eyes’ out of the pineapple
When it’s free from spikey bits, use your bread knife to slice the pineapple into slices about 2cm thick
Stack them up
Cut into quarters
Cut the tough core out and discard
Place the mango and pineapple in a bowl with the satsuma and apple juice
Chop the cucumber; you may prefer to take the core out of the cucumber
Wash your leaves!

Method

Remove the mango and pineapple chunks from the bowl and place in a new bowl with the leaves and cucumber and gently mix together
Drizzle over a little of the reserved fruit juice and sprinkle over some salt
Garnish with the cashews
Serve with fish or meat (Zoe recommends amazing dishes but these would be quick options)

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

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