(Too sweet to waste) pea & potato parcels

(Too sweet to waste) pea & potato parcels

Who doesn’t like a samosa?  Crisp pastry, smooth filling and highly spiced, they are amazing.  These aren’t samosas though: filo pastry is def not authentic as filo is a Greek ingredient.  Also, these are baked, and samosas are deep fried.  Who doesn’t love a brown paper bag, greasy and delicous, smelling of veggies and spices.

Baking these is much easier than deep frying, so as long as you’re not expecting these to taste the same as a samosa, you’re in for a treat.  Creamy potato and the sweet pop of peas is what you’re after.  TBF, you could have leftover carrots, potatoes, broccoli, peas and sweetcorn and still make something delicious for dinner.  Keep the weight of root veg the same as the weight of the potatoes, and the weight of other veg roughly the same as the weight of the peas.  This isn’t MasterChef or a ‘Bake Off’ technical challenge – this is Tuesday night tea, avoiding food waste and saving money with every meal.

Pea & Potato Parcels

Makes about 6
Adapted, barely, from Clare Thompson, ‘The Art of the Larder’, p200

Ingredients

150g raw potato, skin on
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 large onion
5cm piece ginger
2 cloves of garlic, crushed or finely diced 1 fresh chilli/1 teaspoon chilli flakes
1 tablespoon curry powder
4 sheets filo pastry *
80g butter
Salt & pepper

* wrap and freeze leftovers for another time or this!

Prep

Either

Tools

Scales
Saucepan with lid
Sharp knife & chopping board
Frying pan
Grater
Tablespoon & teaspoon/ measuring spoons
Pastry brush
Baking trays
Greaseproof paper/tray liners
Wire cooling rack

Time

1 hour

Level

Harder

Prep

Put the potato in a pan and cover with water, and add a sprinkling of salt. Put the lid on and bring to the boil
It’s important to NOT PEEL! Your potato will be too wet if you peel it and make your little parcels all soggy
If using leftover potatoes/carrots, then mash them in a warm pan and stir around the saucepan to evaporate water from the veg

OR

Boil until cooked/microwave for a few minutes in its skin until cooked through
When cooked, drain water off if boiling and leave to one side

Both

When cool enough to handle, peel off the skin and chop into 5mm chunks
If your peas are frozen, leave to defrost
Finely chop the onion and chilli (if using a fresh one)
Grate the ginger, crush/finely slice the garlic
Line the baking trays with greaseproof paper

Method

Turn the oven to 180C
Place the frying pan on the hob and pour the oil in, and turn to medium heat
Add the onion and fry until soft (about 10m) – you want it see through-ish, not brown
When the onion is cool, add ginger and chilli (optional)
Add diced potato and curry powder, stir through, making sure that everything is coated in the spices
Melt the butter in the microwave or on the hob, in a saucepan
Take a sheet of filo and cut into quarters, so it looks like a little window **
Put a couple of the rectangles on each baking tray (they’re delicate so easier to do this way)
Put a heaped tablespoon of the pea and potato mixture like ***
Pull the other half of the filo over the top and squash the sides together
Using a pastry brush or dot over with a teaspoon and rub over gently with your fingers, give each parcel a buttery glaze
When the parcels on the sheet are done, repeat until you’ve used your filling and pastry
Pop in the oven and bake for 15-20 minutes until golden

** Cut your filo sheet in half widthways and half longways, so you have four smaller rectangles

*** Smoosh the pea and potato filling onto the a filo in a triangle in the corner, so you can fold the pastry back over itself.

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

Leftover jacket potato gnocchi

Leftover jacket potato gnocchi

I’d always been intimidated to try gnocchi, and, as you can see, mine aren’t exactly pretty.  But they taste great.

 

This recipe calls for jacket potatoes as it helps to have slightly drier spuds.  If you want to make a half quantity, just use half an egg, and keep the rest in a little covered pot and save for adding to more eggs for a plate of scrambled eggs another day.

 

Note: we didn’t like it with tomato sauce; it felt too strong. Some pesto or, as I had the second time around, butter and sage, was nicer.

 

Gnocchi, considerably fuglier than Smitten Kitchen’s but still delic​​ious.

 

The flavour of cold old potatoes used to put me off, but no more.  Cooking them through, and with other strong flavours such as cheese or citrus, makes all the difference.  Sure, we can just add them diced and fried to a hash or a bubble, but I love to try something new and bring you some StorrCupboard magic to turn your leftovers into the main event.

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

Leftover jacket potato bake

Leftover jacket potato bake

Aren’t jacket potatoes great?  My life, in all seriousness and smallness, was changed when my ex’s mum stared at my gormless face as she pulled teeny, tiny jacket potatoes out of the oven.  “It’s a way of cooking, not a size” she tutted.  What a revelation: now jacket potatoes could be part of my meal, not the backbone to carry beans and cheese/cheese and sweetcorn/tuna mayo.  Though I love these, maybe a little too much – but now I could have jacket potatoes more often.

 

With lucky timing for comfort food padding as we all contend with the Beast from the East, let’s get using up our jacket potatoes that might be sitting around, needing some love.  There’s got to be more ideas that a bubble or a hash, love them as I do… well, time for some StorrCupboard magic.

 

(Note: this Rachel Roddy pizza is a brilliant vessel for a solitary spud.  It does, I think, need a fresh pizza base, so I didn’t post it as an option that everyone would try.  And I pointed you guys to a pizza last week. So consider this a double carb bonus  … Also: the mixed root veg cakes from a few weeks back are traditionally plain potato cakes, and would work well, too).

So, I know that this isn’t super quick but we are talking potatoes here. So, this is relative…

Bahahaaaa I haven’t told my kids there’s mash potato in their cake!  Think carrot cake: that’s not weird is it?  And a drizzle cake is *supposed* to be dense, zingy and this one certainly is.

 

This recipe calls for mash, but that’s not essential – just mash up your leftover jackets.  I didn’t have quite enough potato, so added some extra flour, and it just fine (I don’t need cake to be gluten free, but some GF flour would be fine, too).

 

I had one blood orange, one lemon and two limes in the fridge, so that’s why my cake is a pretty pink colour.  And tastes great.

Potatoes a la Poulette

Serves 4
Adapted, barely, from ‘I Can Cook’, Ginette Mathiot, p568

Ingredients

EITHER:

30g butter
40g flour
350ml milk
salt and pepper

OR:
1 tub/jar white sauce (around 350ml)

Also:

750 g leftover potatoes
Unsalted butter, for greasing
125g cheese (any; I used cheddar, but anything that melts will work)

Tools

Scales
Chopping board
Knife
Oven-proof dish
Cheese grater

If making white sauce:

Saucepan
Whisk
Wooden spoon

Time

10-30m prep (depends on if you’re making white sauce from scratch)
30-40m to bake

Level:

Easy if you’re using a jar
Medium to tricky if you’re making the sauce/learning to make your own

Prep

Peel the skins off your potatoes
Cut the potatoes into slices about 5mm slices, or just crumble if they’re a bit mashed u
Grate the cheese

White sauce

Place the butter in the saucepan and melt
When melted add the flour and stir together
Add a splash of milk and mix together
When it’s mixed in, add a little more, stirring all the time to avoid lumps forming. If you have a balloon whisk, it’s a lot easier, but a wooden spoon will work just fine
Add a little more milk and keep stirring
When all the milk is added, turn up the heat a little so that the sauce comes to the boil (so that the flour is cooked through, unlike the cheese sauces I made as a lacklustre vegetarian)
Simmer for 5 min
Take off the heat and leave to one side
You may need to give it a vigorous stir before adding to the dish!

Method

Set your oven to 180C
Grease the dish with a little butter/use an old butter paper
Place enough potatoes to make a layer
Pour over half the sauce and half the cheese
Place the other potatoes, and pour over the rest of the sauce and the cheese
Bake for around 30-40m until bubbling and WONDERFUL

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

One sad jacket potato cake

One sad jacket potato cake

Aren’t jacket potatoes great?  My life, in all seriousness and smallness, was changed when my ex’s mum stared at my gormless face as she pulled teeny, tiny jacket potatoes out of the oven.  “It’s a way of cooking, not a size” she tutted.  What a revelation: now jacket potatoes could be part of my meal, not the backbone to carry beans and cheese/cheese and sweetcorn/tuna mayo.  Though I love these, maybe a little too much – but now I could have jacket potatoes more often.

 

With lucky timing for comfort food padding as we all contend with the Beast from the East, let’s get using up our jacket potatoes that might be sitting around, needing some love.  There’s got to be more ideas that a bubble or a hash, love them as I do… well, time for some StorrCupboard magic.

 

(Note: this Rachel Roddy pizza is a brilliant vessel for a solitary spud.  It does, I think, need a fresh pizza base, so I didn’t post it as an option that everyone would try.  And I pointed you guys to a pizza last week. So consider this a double carb bonus  … Also: the mixed root veg cakes from a few weeks back are traditionally plain potato cakes, and would work well, too).

So, I know that this isn’t super quick but we are talking potatoes here. So, this is relative…

Bahahaaaa I haven’t told my kids there’s mash potato in their cake!  Think carrot cake: that’s not weird is it?  And a drizzle cake is *supposed* to be dense, zingy and this one certainly is.

 

This recipe calls for mash, but that’s not essential – just mash up your leftover jackets.  I didn’t have quite enough potato, so added some extra flour, and it just fine (I don’t need cake to be gluten free, but some GF flour would be fine, too).

 

I had one blood orange, one lemon and two limes in the fridge, so that’s why my cake is a pretty pink colour.  And tastes great.

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

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