This was my first experiment with my leftover double cream.

I figured: if a recipes says “cream the butter” and butter is made of cream … well, it can’t go that far wrong?  And I was right.  A little less light than a regular sponge cake but still rich, delicious and cake-y.  If you have say 100ml of cream just whip it and use a combination of butter and cream.

Some people might say that making a cake with this leftover cream is more wasteful, as we’re using more sugar, more flour and butter.  I argue that if you buy a cake, or biscuits or anything sweet that this is a good use of potential bin fodder.  As long as this cake gets eaten, you’ve used the cream to make something new.  And that is a wonderful thing.

I was pretty stumped when I had 500g of leftover cream. 500g! Half a bloody kilo! So first off, proof that it’s only worth buying food when you know what you want to do with it.  But when I thought about it as “thick milk/almost butter”, I freed up my brain to think: what is creamy? What’s nice with cream.  Just stirring some meringues in, or making into ice-cream sundaes would be great.

Leftover cream sponge

Makes Victoria sponge sized cake

Ingredients

250g whipped/double cream 250g caster sugar
250g plain flour
1tsp baking powder
50g cocoa powder (optional)
Pinch salt
4 eggs
75ml milk
1tsp vanilla essence

Icing

150g whipped/double cream
500g caster sugar
About 50ml milk
Optional: flavouring, e.g., a few drops of mint or orange essence, or dissolve 2 teaspoons of instant coffee in hot water

Tools

 

Optional/Helpful

Electric whisk/stand mixer/food processor
Measuring spoons

Time

10m prep
10-20m to mix the cake
30-40 baking
Couple of hours to cool fully

Level

Medium

Prep

Line the bottom of your cake tin with greaseproof paper
Turn the oven to 180C
If your leftover cream isn’t whisked, whisk it until it’s in peaks (with a hand whisk this will take no time at all; longer with a hand whisk or pour into a clean jam jar, screw the lid on *tightly* and shake shake shake until it’s whisked)

Method **

Whisk/sift together the flour, baking powder, bicarb and salt into a small bowl and set aside
In a larger bowl, whisk together whisked cream and sugar
Add one egg and beat until fully combined, then about a third of the flour mixture
Keep on going until you’ve used up all of the egg and flour
The mixture will be quite thick; add in your vanilla and a couple of tablespoons of milk, stir in|
Keep adding milk until the batter drops off the whisk in dollops
Spoon the mixture into the cake tins, half and half, and bake for 20 minutes
Check on the cake after 20 minutes; they may well need longer
They are cooked when a cake tester/skewer comes out clean
Leave to sit on a wire rack for 10m in its tin before removing
Remove from the tin and leave to cool, fully

 

Food Processor Method

** If you have a food processor, put everything in except the milk. Turn on. Blend
Check for thickness. Gently add milk until it’s a thick dropping consistency, and bake as the rest of the instructions

Icing

Place butter in a large bowl
Sift over icing sugar
Beat together
Add milk a tablespoon-full at a time until you have an icing that is thin enough to spread
If using a flavouring, add at the end and mix through thoroughly

Combine the cakes

Look at the two cakes. Take the fattest and use it for the bottom
If it’s got a big hill in the middle, take a bread/serrated knife and slice off a little to make it more flat. Eat that bit
Take about quarter of the icing and place in the middle of the cake
Use your spatula to spread it out
Pop the next quarter on and add it
Place second cake on top and repeat the icing steps
I am unable to ice a cake neatly so always go with “intentionally messy”

Storage

If you’re not going to eat within 24 hours, I’d cut this into pieces and freeze.

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

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