This post came because I bought a *huge* pot of double cream on yellow sticker clearance and forgot about it.  It wasn’t off at all, but I felt a little  old … yeah even I had second thoughts.  I tried making it into butter by pouring the double cream into a large jar (a clean, old mega-mayonnaise jar) and shaking and shaking but … five minutes later and my arms were tired and I was bored.

 

Making butter is great but who has the time to do that, in any normal week??  And it only works with double cream – you’ll never make butter with single cream.  Not enough fat.  Seriously.  So here are some helpful recipes to make sure that the cream you bought to go with your Sunday apple crumble doesn’t end up in the bin.

 

I put out a call on my Insta stories about what to do with half a kilo of whipped cream and got loads of ideas: making a pavlova, freezing it in little portions for a later date and more were all great.

 

But once I got thinking I got thinking and thinking and my mind starting whirring so here, my friends, are 3 things you can – no, *should* – do with your leftover double cream.

 

Note: my half-hearted butter attempts meant I had very whipped cream, not pouring double cream.

 

Keep your cream in the fridge until needed.  Give it a sniff. Even if it’s past it’s Best Before date, and you are in good health/not pregnant etc., you should be fine.

 

Pancake mix/batter needs milk.  American pancakes often use buttermilk.  A great approximation of this is half full fat yoghurt and half milk.  So, why not cream instead?  Just whisk the milk and cream together and you have just a creamier milk.  You can do this with any cream or yoghurt.  Won’t always be the same, but you are saving cash.  And avoiding food waste.

(Leftover cream) pancakes
Serves 4

Ingredients

around 150ml cream
around150ml milk
2 eggs
225g plain flour
2 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon sugar
Pinch salt
30g unsalted butter + more for frying

Prep

Turn oven to 100C
Mix flour, baking powder, salt and sugar together in a bowl
Melt the 30g of butter in the microwave or on the hob and set aside

Tools

Scales
Mixing bowls
Measuring jug
Fork
Balloon whisk
Frying pan
Teaspoon
Oven-proof dish

Time

10m prep
20m cooking

Level

Medium

Method

Add cream to jug and top with milk until you have 300ml
Whisk together
Crack the eggs in and whisk until fully mixed
If you’re using a big jug, add the flour mixtrure straight in and beat until smooth
If you don’t have a massive measuring jug, pour the liquid into the bowl and beat until there are no lumps remaining
Stir the melted butter through
** Put frying pan on the hob and add a pinch of butter – sort of 2 peas worth
Put the heat to medium hot
When the butter sizzles, pick the pan up and swirl it around so the butter is all over the bottom
Pour the batter on – enough so the pancake is about 6-7cm across (I can only cook 3 a time in my large pan)
Turn the heat to medium
The pancakes are ready to turn when little bubbles appear on the surface
Using your flipper, flip them!
Mine are rarely perfect circles, so don’t worry about that
Cook for about a minute. They’re done when they are golden on the bottom
Place in the oven-proof dish, pop in the oven and start from **, until you have used all of your mixture
Serve with jam, or spreads, or fried eggs and bacon

Leftovers?
Store in a lidded container in the fridge. Use as soon as possible for the best taste, but they keep okay for up to 3 days
Reheating: in the microwave for a few seconds, or in a dry frying pan

Got a question? Ingredient you need help with? Get in touch:

ann@storrcupboard.com

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